Christ Episcopal Church Sei Ko Kai

Christ Episcopal Church Sei Ko Kai

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Martin Luther nailing his 95 theses (objections to the Catholic practice on selling indulgences) to a Wittemberg church door on Oct 31, 1617. Considered the start of the Reformation.
Nice review. Inspires me to see this all the more. Critics observed this movie is not so much about crazy rich Singaporeans as it is about an Asian American woman appreciating who she really is and what she and her mother accomplished in imigrating to America.
Thank you for welcoming Shigeko-san and me today.
:)
Hey Sei Ko Kai Members,

I hope that you had a wonderful Thanksgiving. I am currently a declared Molecular and Cell Biology major with an emphasis in Medical Cell and Developmental Biology at the University of California Berkeley. As part of my career aspirations, I have had an internship at a Cancer Research Lab at UCSF. Here’s the link to our website if you would like to look into what we are doing (http://labmed.ucsf.edu/wiita/index.html).

Last year, I got involved with Camp Kesem, a nationwide community that supports children through and beyond their parent's cancer by providing a week-long summer camp. Led by passionate, trained student leaders just like me from over 100 colleges nationwide, Camp Kesem provides free summer camping experiences and year-round support to over 7,200 children affected by a parent’s cancer. Camp Kesem is the largest nonprofit organization dedicated to this often-overlooked population of children.They are able to go at no cost to them or their families because of the fundraising the camp counselors do.

Last year I went to camp as a Unit Leader for the green unit which is kids age 7. My camp name is "Uncle Samurai". This experience showed me just how strong and amazing these kids are!

That is where you come in! My personal goal this year is $3000 dollars. With that amount of money, I will be able to provide the magic of camp to six youth campers. Today is Giving Tuesday, which means that 100% of your donations made in the next 24 hours will go to the kids with zero processing fees (i.e. all the money goes to the kids!).

If you are unable to provide financially at the current time I would really appreciate if you could pass this message along to your friends and help me reach my donation goal! Thank you so much for always supporting me and my efforts and I look forward to hearing from you soon!

The link to support my efforts is (https://donate.kesem.org/unclesamurai)

Sincerely,
Yoshio Boris
"Uncle Samurai"
Hey Sei Ko Kai Members,

I hope that you had a wonderful Thanksgiving! I am currently a declared Molecular and Cell Biology major with an emphasis in Medical Cell and Developmental Biology at the University of California Berkeley. As part of my career aspirations, I have had an internship at a Cancer Research Lab at UCSF. Here’s the link to our website if you would like to look into what we are doing (http://labmed.ucsf.edu/wiita/index.html).

Last year, I got involved with Camp Kesem, a nationwide community that supports children through and beyond their parent's cancer by providing a week-long summer camp. Led by passionate, trained student leaders just like me from over 100 colleges nationwide, Camp Kesem provides free summer camping experiences and year-round support to over 7,200 children affected by a parent’s cancer. Camp Kesem is the largest nonprofit organization dedicated to this often-overlooked population of children.They are able to go at no cost to them or their families because of the fundraising the camp counselors do.

Last year I went to camp as a Unit Leader for the green unit which is kids age 7. My camp name is "Uncle Samurai". This experience showed me just how strong and amazing these kids are!

That is where you come in! My personal goal this year is $3000 dollars. With that amount of money, I will be able to provide the magic of camp to six youth campers. Today is Giving Tuesday, which means that 100% of your donations made in the next 24 hours will go to the kids with zero processing fees (i.e. all the money goes to the kids!).

If you are unable to provide financially at the current time I would really appreciate if you could pass this message along to your friends and help me reach my donation goal! Thank you so much for always supporting me and my efforts and I look forward to hearing from you soon!

The link to support my efforts is (https://donate.kesem.org/unclesamurai)

Sincerely,
Yoshio Boris
"Uncle Samurai"
John and I attended a wonderful and spirited service led by Rev Debbie Low -Skinner on July 2. WE had a great time talking with members of Sei Ko Kai . The Spirit is strong within this congregation!
Please check out the Japanese Convocation new FB page "Japanese Episcopal Anglican Network" and Save the Date: September 27-October 1 2018 for the EAM Consultation.

We were started in 1895 as a church for Japanese-speaking Episcopalians; we are now primarily English-speaking people of Japanese, Chinese and Caucasian heritage.

http://seikokai.org We were started as a church for Japanese-speaking Episcopalians; we are now primarily English-speaking people of Japanese, Chinese and Caucasian heritage. Vicar: The Rev. Debbie Low-Skinner.

Operating as usual

Timeline Photos 07/14/2021

Timeline Photos

Diocal News & Events: Bishop Marc in the AMERICA IS All IN Commercial!, Sacred Ground list, and more - https://mailchi.mp/diocal/07132021

07/12/2021

From Japanese people living in Japan to those of mixed Japanese descent around the world, the Japanese cultural, ethnic and national identities are in fact, surprisingly diverse. Join us on Saturday, July 31, 2021 at 1pm PDT for a special online film screening of the new documentary "Being Japanese" followed by a discussion panel featuring filmmaker Greg Lam, popular vlogger of everyday life in Japan on the YouTube channel "Life Where I'm From." $8 Center members, $10 general public; registration includes online streaming rental access of the full documentary film. Register online: http://bit.ly/beingjapanesedoc

Once-Suppressed Dorothea Lange Photos Capture Wartime Paranoia | KQED 07/12/2021

Once-Suppressed Dorothea Lange Photos Capture Wartime Paranoia | KQED

"(Dorothea) Lange’s photographs of the roundups are among her most damning, clearly exposing Executive Order 9066 as an act of ethnic cleansing. And though Lange is recognized for her portraiture, one grim still life captures the nature of the deportations. Suitcases, bundles, boxes and wicker baskets are piled on the curb in front of a house. One box reads “White King Quick Dissolving Soap,” another “Gimbals Candy,” and two plain boxes have "Nakaso" written on them, presumably the owners' family name."

Once-Suppressed Dorothea Lange Photos Capture Wartime Paranoia | KQED At the Oakland Museum of California, Dorothea Lange's photographs of the Japanese-American internment offer an important record of Manzanar and the deportations.

A Digital Cat Is Melting Hearts (and Napping a Lot) in Japan 07/09/2021

A Digital Cat Is Melting Hearts (and Napping a Lot) in Japan

"Takayuki Ohkawa, a spokesman for the Japanese conglomerate Unika, one of the two companies running the feline display, said that the cat does not have an official name. (Fans have called it “Shinjuku east exit cat,” after the station.)

“There are many reasons we decided to display the cat, but one of the big reasons is that with corona, the world became very dark,” Mr. Ohkawa added, referring to the coronavirus pandemic. “Through the cat display, we wanted to revive Shinjuku and make it brighter.”

A Digital Cat Is Melting Hearts (and Napping a Lot) in Japan The calico prances and dozes on a 26-by-62-foot LED billboard in Tokyo. It has drawn crowds in real life and sparked joy on social media.

07/09/2021

We are excited that our [email protected] program is just a week away! 👘🥟🍣🍜🏮

This year, our theme is “[email protected] Mo Ichido” or, in English, [email protected] One More Time! We hope to see you there, online!

We also want to ensure you are able to join in from home as we dance “Odori” [Japanese Dance]. The dancing is typically one of main events of the weekend. It’s a time for us to remember those that have passed on and to honor our ancestors. Below is a link which includes several practice videos from years past as well as 2021’s new dance, “Remember Me”.

Dance Practice link: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLf-44kymltGW8gUGbDZPx-Rs9mUjV1y72

Japanese American summer camp in Berkeley still thriving 43 years later 07/07/2021

Japanese American summer camp in Berkeley still thriving 43 years later

https://www.berkeleyside.org/2021/07/04/daruma-no-gakko-japanese-amercan-summer-camp-berkele

Japanese American summer camp in Berkeley still thriving 43 years later Daruma no Gakko, a Japanese American summer camp, was started in 1978 by 10 women who didn't want their culture lost on children.

S.F. Japanese American churches welcome new faces during the pandemic » Nichi Bei 07/01/2021

S.F. Japanese American churches welcome new faces during the pandemic » Nichi Bei

I was very pleased by the "Nichi Bei Weekly" article that reporter Tomo Hirai wrote after our phone interview in late May.

If you can, pick up the entire June 24th edition to read all the info on Obon festival activities in the Bay Area and elsewhere in the United States.

https://www.nichibei.org/2021/06/s-f-japanese-american-churches-welcome-new-faces-during-the-pandemic/

S.F. Japanese American churches welcome new faces during the pandemic » Nichi Bei Each year, clergy members shift across the United States. San Francisco’s Japantown is no different as retirements, promotions and transfers have brought change among its religious leaders serving the Japanese American community.

07/01/2021

Get ready it’s going to be fun summer in Japantown!!!
Repost from @nihonmachisf Yup we are coming back! Jaoantown will be popping with excitement this summer! Save the dates and look out for what’s in store 😉
#nihonmachisf #nsf45 #nihonmachistreetfair #ourcommunityourpride #alohabythebay #summeroflove #sanfrancisco #sfjapantown #japantownsf

Photos from Nichi Bei Foundation's post 06/29/2021

Photos from Nichi Bei Foundation's post

Asian Americans: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO) 06/11/2021

Asian Americans: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)

Asian Americans: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO) John Oliver discusses the large and diverse group of people who fall under the term “Asian American”, the history of the model minority stereotype, and why o...

Photos from Christ Episcopal Church Sei Ko Kai's post 05/31/2021

In an inventory of artwork, our church owns five Sadao Watanabe prints. He is the greatest Japanese Christian artist of the 20th century. The prints depict the Last Supper, Jesus and his apostles; Jesus talking about being the vine and believers being the branches; Mary and Joseph fleeing to Egypt; and three fishermen (Peter, James, and John?).

According to artnet.com: "Sadao Watanabe was a Japanese artist best known for his prints that meld biblical imagery with the traditional Japanese folk art known as mingei. Watanabe's work portrays the Christian gospel with a distinctive use of crumpled wet paper mixed with mineral pigments suspended in soy milk, known as katazome."

[05/30/21]   Here is the farewell/Pentecost sermon I preached last week.

FAREWELL EUCHARIST/HAWAIIAN MASS, Pentecost, 23 May 2021
Christ Episcopal Church Sei Ko Kai, San Francisco, CA
The Rev. Debra Low-Skinner, Vicar

It is said that, when Jesus had his Transfiguration experience on the top of Mount Tabor, when he was speaking with Moses and Elijah and God, Jesus knew then and there it was time to begin the final countdown of his life and ministry on Earth. No longer would he be lying low and spreading the Good News in obscurity in Galilee. He was to proceed south. South towards certain death--by going to Jerusalem, where the Jewish Temple authorities, King Herod, and Roman governor Pontius Pilate would see to it that this zealot Jesus, this so-called Messiah, this trouble-maker, would be put to death and silenced once and for all.

But Jesus knew, as God had told him, that Jesus’ arrest/torture and his crucifixion/death, would not be the end of Jesus’ story. For the ultimate end of God’s plan was to save and to reconcile with all humankind forever. So, after Jesus’ death, he was resurrected; he appeared to certain select disciples; he instructed and equipped the apostles to carry on his work in the world; and then he ascended into heaven, in full sight of the apostles. Ten days afterwards, God sent the Holy Spirit as a gift to the apostles, who were gathered together in that Upper Room in Jerusalem. This was the Spirit of Truth, the Holy Comforter, the Paraclete and Counselor, and the Lord and Giver of Life. This Spirit came to encourage and embolden the apostles. To symbolically light a fire under them (or rather that the Spirit appeared like tongues of fire that rested upon each of their heads). The gifts of the Spirit then enlightened their minds, informed their speech, and enabled them to speak in many tongues, so that people would understand the Good News wherever in the world the apostles would go to evangelize.

So, on this Day of Pentecost (50 days after Jesus Christ’s Resurrection on Easter and 10 days after his Ascension into heaven), we celebrate that the Body of Christ, which is the Church, is still at work in the world in the here and now. We, who are baptized members of the Church, are both children of God and incarnations of the Holy Spirit; together we form the Body of Christ. As Christ’s embodied Church, we vowed at our baptisms and at our confirmations to live, pray, love, and act on whatever the Spirit inspires us to do--and to be—as Christ in the world and to honor the Christ in each another. Accordingly, we follow the ways that Jesus Christ showed the apostles: by visiting and healing the sick; feeding the hungry; giving water to the thirsty; clothing the naked; giving encouragement to those in despair; and befriending widows, orphans, foreigners, the marginalized, and those who are physically, mentally, or spiritually challenged in any way. As we go on living and loving others as Christ did, we continue the apostles’ work of spreading the Good News of God’s love and salvation.

So today we celebrate that Christ lives on, individually, in each and every one of us. We also celebrate today that Christ lives on, communally, in us as Christ Church Sei Ko Kai. And it has been ever so, that Christ has lived on in all the parishioners and priests who have worshipped here over the past 126 years. As it was it the beginning when Sei Ko Kai was founded in 1895, as it is now in 2021, and (by God’s grace) as it will be so in the years to come that Christ’s Church will live on, love on, and continue to be active in the world through the prayers and good works of us who are members of Sei Ko Kai.

At this time in the history of Sei Ko Kai, I am leaving you to go where the Holy Spirit is calling me next, which is to be the Canon to the Ordinary (Pro Tempore) of this Diocese. We don’t know right now who will succeed me as your Priest-in-Charge. But I will continue to cheer you on and to do my part to see that your next priest will be a good match and will lead you forward in ministry as the Body of Christ to wherever the Holy Spirit calls you next.

Finally, I want to say, with all my heart, how grateful I am to have been your Vicar and your pastor and your friend. I also have been so honored to have been your representative in the Japanese American and Asian American community, both on the local scene and at large in the Episcopal Church. I cannot thank you enough for your love and support these past five years. In addition, it has been a real gift in my ministry to have served this Asian American congre-gation, where I can be who I am and say what I really think as an Asian American, without having to worry that non-Asians might be offended or not understand the subtle and not-so-subtle racism and microaggressions we have all experienced at one time or another in our lives.

In closing, I want to say what I said most recently during last week’s Executive Council meeting. I feel most strongly that the Holy Spirit is impelling and emboldening us all. This is the time, as perhaps no other time in history, to speak up as Asian Americans against racism/hate, to speak up as progressive and compassionate Episcopalians, and to act out as apostles of Christ with loving hearts and willing hands to help bring Christ’s salvation and healing to this polarized, sin-sick, and suffering world.

Our story--individually and collectively--as Sei Ko Kai and as members of the Body of Christ is not over yet. Let us, with God’s loving help, see what the next chapter brings, as the Holy Spirit will reveal it and will enlighten, embolden, and inspire us to meet it. Amen.

05/30/2021

May 30 on the Episcopal Church calendar is the feast of St. Jeanne d’Arc (Joan of Arc), Mystic and Soldier.

[05/30/21]   Starting next Sunday, June 6th, our 10am Sunday Holy Eucharists will be offered via Zoom at:
Meeting ID: 862 7719 4739
Passcode: 828629

Holy, Holy, Holy! Lord God Almighty! (Nicaea) 05/30/2021

Holy, Holy, Holy! Lord God Almighty! (Nicaea)

For Trinity Sunday, this hymn says "God, in Three Persons, perfect Trinity."

Holy, Holy, Holy! Lord God Almighty! (Nicaea) Provided to YouTube by harmonia mundiHoly, Holy, Holy! Lord God Almighty! (Nicaea) · Choir of King's College, Cambridge · Stephen CleoburyHymns from King's℗ ...

05/30/2021

Timeline Photos 05/30/2021

Timeline Photos

A symbol of San Francisco's history and vitality, Palace Hotel reopens after more than a year 05/29/2021

A symbol of San Francisco's history and vitality, Palace Hotel reopens after more than a year

"So the (reopening of the historic) Palace (Hotel in SF) has endured earthquake, fires, good times and bad and now the virus. (Hotel General Manager Clifton) Clark is optimistic. The big $6 million convention that was canceled in March 2020 has rescheduled for 2023. The hotel is offering a Legacy Package with a room, parking, tea and Champagne. Bookings are promising. “No hotel is like this one,” Clark said. “We are one of a kind.”

I look forward to someday having again high tea in their Garden Court under the massive Tiffany-domed ceiling.

A symbol of San Francisco's history and vitality, Palace Hotel reopens after more than a year More than a year after closing its doors, San Francisco’s Palace Hotel has reopened....

Timeline Photos 05/29/2021

Timeline Photos

Read: David Brooks’s message to the Boston College Class of 2021 05/29/2021

Read: David Brooks’s message to the Boston College Class of 2021

A lot of good observations here, by NY Times columnist and author David Brooks, in his Commencement Address on May 24, 2021 at Boston College (a Jesuit university). Many of his thoughts are worth reflecting upon at length. Here's one of them:

"For 15 months we’ve been wearing masks. People wear masks when they feel unsafe. It filters out the virus but it also filters out each other. Two people wearing masks find it easier to walk by each other on the street without recognizing the presence of another human being.

"But of course, we don’t only wear physical masks, but also psychological ones. Productivity is a mask. I’m too busy to stop and see you. The meritocracy is a mask. I judge you by what school you went to and what job you got. Essentialism is a mask. I can make all sorts of assumptions about you based on what racial or ethnic group you are in. Fear is a mask. I don’t show you myself because I’m afraid you won’t like me. Emotional avoidance is a mask. I hide parts of myself because I’m afraid to confront my own feelings.

"Worst and most serious of all, distrust is a mask. I wall myself in because I’m suspicious you will hurt me. Distrust is at record levels in America today. It is the cancer eating away at our relationships, our politics and our society. And I have to admit a lot of this distrust is earned distrust. People feel betrayed because they have been betrayed. But distrust breeds distrust. When somebody is distrusting of me, I am distrusting toward them and we spiral into a distrust doom loop. That is the state we are in now. This is how nations fail, families fail, organizations fail.

"But in the weeks and months ahead we will be unmasking. As we take off the physical masks, it seems important that we also take off some of the emotional ones."

Read: David Brooks’s message to the Boston College Class of 2021 'You entered BC during one historical era which had one set of values. You graduate from BC at the start of a different historical era, with a new set of values, which you will write with the book of your lives.'

Timeline Photos 05/29/2021

Timeline Photos

Asian American Military Contributions 05/29/2021

Asian American Military Contributions

On this Memorial Day weekend, we remember AAPI persons who served our country in the military.

Asian American Military Contributions Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders have made significant contributions to the US military dating back to the War of 1812. May is Asian Pacific American Heritage Month and to honor those many con…

05/28/2021

The observance of Trinity Sunday began in England while Thomas Becket was Archbishop of Canterbury. After his murder in 1170, Becket quickly became the most popular saint in the Western Church, and Trinity Sunday became a feast day throughout all of Europe.

05/28/2021

On this Memorial Day, we remember the dead. Those who gave their lives in service to this country. We also remember our loved ones who died from COVID-19, cancer, heart disease, gun violence, etc. Blessed are those who die in the Lord, for they rest from their labors.

The dead are not distant or absent. They are alongside us. When we lose someone to death, we lose their physical image and presence, they slip out of visible form into invisible presence. This alteration of form is the reason we cannot see the dead. But because we cannot see them does not mean that they are not there. Transfigured into eternal form, the dead cannot reverse the journey and even for one second re-enter their old form to linger with us a while. Though they cannot reappear, they continue to be near us and part of the healing of grief is the refinement of our hearts whereby we come to sense their loving nearness. When we ourselves enter the eternal world and come to see our lives on earth in full view, we may be surprised at the immense assistance and support with which our departed loved ones have accompanied every moment of our lives. In their new, transfigured presence their compassion, understanding and love take on a divine depth, enabling them to become secret angels guiding and sheltering the unfolding of our destiny.

JOHN O'DONOHUE

Excerpt from his books, Beauty: The Invisible Embrace (US) / Divine Beauty (Europe)
Ordering Info: https://johnodonohue.com/store

Co. Kerry, Ireland
Photo: © Ann Cahill

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Location

Telephone

Address


2140 Pierce St
San Francisco, CA
94115

Opening Hours

10am - 1pm
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