The Episcopal Church of Saint John the Evangelist

Welcome to the Episcopal Church of St. John the Evangelist. Located around the corner from the busy Mission-16th Street-Valencia corridors in San Francisco’s north Mission District.

Sunday services are at 10:15 a.m. Parish Office Hours
Tuesday-Thursday 1-4 pm
(415) 861-1436

1661 Fifteenth Street at Julian Avenue
(main entrance on Julian)
San Francisco, CA 94103

Operating as usual

05/28/2021

“’Can I come?’ The answer, as it always is, was yes.”

--Quoted from article in San Francisco Chronicle.

In one short exchange in the Saint John’s Garden, Heather Knight, in her piece about the Gubbio Project, captured what is at the heart of Saint John's -- being welcoming.

And it is true, all are welcome! On June 6, onsite and in person worship will be offered. If you are planning on joining us in person, please let us know via this survey. Our regathering welcome notice will be provided next week via this newsletter and on our website.

Juana Gruber, an unhoused San Francisco resident, asked the question above “Can I come?” one day when she saw people sitting in the courtyard. She said of the church and courtyard, “It’s precious. For me, it’s paradise.” Juana captures my sentiments exactly.

Since moving to the Mission, I’ve been fortunate to hear about and witness how much our garden means to us and the neighborhood:

-- In the 1980s and 1990s, we opened our hearts and provided sanctuary to men dying of AIDS and many of their ashes are scattered around the garden.

-- Recently, my next-door neighbor, Pablo, started joining us in the garden to enjoy the sunshine and calm. Recently, he mentioned that several times he rented the garden for parties for his children and it holds special memories for his family.

-- During the pandemic, we’ve been able to continue some of ministries to the garden as well: Julian pantry, urban mystics, homeless kit fellowship, etc.

-- In August, the garden provided the perfect safe space to allow the Swenson-Mayer family and us to grieve and celebrate Julie Mayer’s life and our loss.

-- In June, we watched two beautiful yellow butterflies dance between Jeremy and us at our wedding. This moment is etched in families’ hearts and memories. Jeremy had just said a prayer of thanksgiving for all those who stepped up when I was orphaned and on cue these beautiful butterflies joined us. Many who watched believe it was a symbol of my parents unwavering love, even in their absence.

I’m sure you have beautiful memories of your own too. In June, we hope to see you in person or on Zoom. Thank you to the Taskforce team who’s work these last two weeks has been amazing. Thank you Heather Knight for your beautiful piece on Gubbio and Saint John’s.

“What people see in a garden is a reflection of what is in their heart.” – Shoukei Matsumoto

~Elizabeth Orbison

“’Can I come?’ The answer, as it always is, was yes.”

--Quoted from article in San Francisco Chronicle.

In one short exchange in the Saint John’s Garden, Heather Knight, in her piece about the Gubbio Project, captured what is at the heart of Saint John's -- being welcoming.

And it is true, all are welcome! On June 6, onsite and in person worship will be offered. If you are planning on joining us in person, please let us know via this survey. Our regathering welcome notice will be provided next week via this newsletter and on our website.

Juana Gruber, an unhoused San Francisco resident, asked the question above “Can I come?” one day when she saw people sitting in the courtyard. She said of the church and courtyard, “It’s precious. For me, it’s paradise.” Juana captures my sentiments exactly.

Since moving to the Mission, I’ve been fortunate to hear about and witness how much our garden means to us and the neighborhood:

-- In the 1980s and 1990s, we opened our hearts and provided sanctuary to men dying of AIDS and many of their ashes are scattered around the garden.

-- Recently, my next-door neighbor, Pablo, started joining us in the garden to enjoy the sunshine and calm. Recently, he mentioned that several times he rented the garden for parties for his children and it holds special memories for his family.

-- During the pandemic, we’ve been able to continue some of ministries to the garden as well: Julian pantry, urban mystics, homeless kit fellowship, etc.

-- In August, the garden provided the perfect safe space to allow the Swenson-Mayer family and us to grieve and celebrate Julie Mayer’s life and our loss.

-- In June, we watched two beautiful yellow butterflies dance between Jeremy and us at our wedding. This moment is etched in families’ hearts and memories. Jeremy had just said a prayer of thanksgiving for all those who stepped up when I was orphaned and on cue these beautiful butterflies joined us. Many who watched believe it was a symbol of my parents unwavering love, even in their absence.

I’m sure you have beautiful memories of your own too. In June, we hope to see you in person or on Zoom. Thank you to the Taskforce team who’s work these last two weeks has been amazing. Thank you Heather Knight for your beautiful piece on Gubbio and Saint John’s.

“What people see in a garden is a reflection of what is in their heart.” – Shoukei Matsumoto

~Elizabeth Orbison

DA closes Amilcar Lopez case, but the community trauma still remains | 48 hills 05/28/2021

DA closes Amilcar Lopez case, but the community trauma still remains | 48 hills

Our priest associate, the Rev. Dr. Richard Smith, has some words on the outcome of the case in which Amilcar Pérez López was shot and killed by police right here in the Mission District in 2015.

St. John’s hosted Amilcar’s San Francisco funeral service (his family held a funeral and buried him in Guatemala); we vigiled outside the police station every week for a year; we marched; we wrote letters; we testified at city hearings; we raised funds for Amilcar’s family and for the mural dedicated to his memory on 24th St. This summary from Fr. Richard is an important reflection on where we are now.

Amilcar, Presente! May your memory be a blessing and an inspiration in our work for justice.

DA closes Amilcar Lopez case, but the community trauma still remains | 48 hills San Francisco needs to make big changes in policing so this young immigrant didn't die in vain.

05/26/2021

Getting ready for Gubbio’s #SacredSleep to reopen at #StJohnsintheMission on June 1st!

More information on the changes here—St. John’s is now the host site and main office for Gubbio:

https://www.sfchronicle.com/local/heatherknight/article/Beloved-S-F-homeless-nonprofit-was-booted-from-16203214.php

Photo credit: Lydia Bransten

Getting ready for Gubbio’s #SacredSleep to reopen at #StJohnsintheMission on June 1st!

More information on the changes here—St. John’s is now the host site and main office for Gubbio:

https://www.sfchronicle.com/local/heatherknight/article/Beloved-S-F-homeless-nonprofit-was-booted-from-16203214.php

Photo credit: Lydia Bransten

Beloved S.F. homeless nonprofit was booted from its Tenderloin space. Will S.F. residents step up to save it? 05/26/2021

Beloved S.F. homeless nonprofit was booted from its Tenderloin space. Will S.F. residents step up to save it?

As the Bay Area is re-opening, St. John's is glad to be deepening our relationship with our ministry partner, The Gubbio Project as they move their operations over to our church building entirely. Today, SF Chronicle report Heather Knight has a profile article about Gubbio's accomplishments and needs in this transitional time. Please consider donating to this wonderful project, and perhaps volunteering also!

#StJohnsintheMission #MoreLove #MasAmor

https://www.sfchronicle.com/local/heatherknight/article/Beloved-S-F-homeless-nonprofit-was-booted-from-16203214.php

Beloved S.F. homeless nonprofit was booted from its Tenderloin space. Will S.F. residents step up to save it? The Gubbio Project has provided “sacred sleep” to homeless people at St. Boniface...

Photos from The Episcopal Church of Saint John the Evangelist's post 05/26/2021

New additions to the garden. From the garden of Carl Folk, donated by Michael Mallory in his memory.

Help the Gubbio Project provide new beds for our Sacred Sleep program! 05/23/2021

Help the Gubbio Project provide new beds for our Sacred Sleep program!

We are so very glad to announce that our ministry partner, The Gubbio Project (https://www.thegubbioproject.org/), will be opening the doors of the church to offer their Sacred Sleep program again, starting on the morning of June 1. Here is a chance to support this wonderful re-opening by helping Gubbio to purchase new beds for the program. Please make a donation! Lots of info about the reopening in the link as well. Welcome home, friends.
#StJohnsintheMission #SacredSleep #MoreLove #MasAmor

Help the Gubbio Project provide new beds for our Sacred Sleep program! The Gubbio Project is excited to safely reopen our Sacred Sleep program at St. John's in the Mission. We need new beds for our guests, giving them a more comfortable, dignified, and safe sleeping experience. We are asking for your help!

05/21/2021

Pentecost and New Beginnings

The feast of Pentecost has special meaning for me. It was on this day, 30 years ago, Pentecost Sunday, 1991, that I was ordained to pastoral ministry. I vividly remember that day in a Presbyterian church in New York City. I had hope, I had hair, and I was deeply in love with the woman who would become my wife just 4 months later.

Of course, as far as the Episcopal church is concerned, I was ordained a priest just this past December. I’ve been retrofitted! Things have changed a lot over 30 years: the hair is gone; but the hope and the love, they have the added strength of being tested by time. I could never have guessed the ministry context I find myself in today at Saint John’s as we emerge from a pandemic. An old joke comes to mind: if you want to make God laugh, tell her your plans.

I’ve been mulling over one of the optional scripture readings for this Sunday. It’s not one we’re using, but I think it’s worth mentioning: Ezekiel 37:1-14. The prophet is a given a vision of a valley filled with dry human bones. (What a creepy place for a spiritual encounter)! God asks the simple question: “can these bones live?” Ezekiel takes one look at the battlefield that has become a mass grave and decides the answer is above his pay grade: “O Lord God, only you know.”

When instructed to prophesy to the boneyard, he does so: “I will cause breath to enter you and you shall live” and the bones reassemble themselves into whole bodies— flesh, blood and skin. But they still aren’t alive because they’re not breathing. In a moment of Lord of the Rings-level spectacle, the prophet gives another summons: “come from the four winds, O breath!” The breath comes and the dead are brought to life.

Of course, this is a vision. The big reveal is that this is a promise, made super vivid, that the exiles in Babylon are going to return to their homeland. Not just a meandering relocation—their faith and worship, their life with God will be restored. The prophet’s name points to what his decades of ministry will be about: Ezekiel means, “God strengthens.”

We’ve been in a kind of exile for the past year and a half. We’re processing the first taste of what it means to begin to take steps back home. Pentecost reminds us that we are not lifeless or helpless. We may not have the words or the wisdom yet, but we have the Spirit, all of us—not just the prophets and priests—we have God’s promised strength to discern, re-enter, re-gather and re-engage.

More love,

Scot+
Supply Priest

REMINDER: The re-opening task force will be giving an update and hosting a discussion this coming Sunday, May 23rd, 11:45AM (regular Sunday Morning Worship link). All are welcome!

Pentecost and New Beginnings

The feast of Pentecost has special meaning for me. It was on this day, 30 years ago, Pentecost Sunday, 1991, that I was ordained to pastoral ministry. I vividly remember that day in a Presbyterian church in New York City. I had hope, I had hair, and I was deeply in love with the woman who would become my wife just 4 months later.

Of course, as far as the Episcopal church is concerned, I was ordained a priest just this past December. I’ve been retrofitted! Things have changed a lot over 30 years: the hair is gone; but the hope and the love, they have the added strength of being tested by time. I could never have guessed the ministry context I find myself in today at Saint John’s as we emerge from a pandemic. An old joke comes to mind: if you want to make God laugh, tell her your plans.

I’ve been mulling over one of the optional scripture readings for this Sunday. It’s not one we’re using, but I think it’s worth mentioning: Ezekiel 37:1-14. The prophet is a given a vision of a valley filled with dry human bones. (What a creepy place for a spiritual encounter)! God asks the simple question: “can these bones live?” Ezekiel takes one look at the battlefield that has become a mass grave and decides the answer is above his pay grade: “O Lord God, only you know.”

When instructed to prophesy to the boneyard, he does so: “I will cause breath to enter you and you shall live” and the bones reassemble themselves into whole bodies— flesh, blood and skin. But they still aren’t alive because they’re not breathing. In a moment of Lord of the Rings-level spectacle, the prophet gives another summons: “come from the four winds, O breath!” The breath comes and the dead are brought to life.

Of course, this is a vision. The big reveal is that this is a promise, made super vivid, that the exiles in Babylon are going to return to their homeland. Not just a meandering relocation—their faith and worship, their life with God will be restored. The prophet’s name points to what his decades of ministry will be about: Ezekiel means, “God strengthens.”

We’ve been in a kind of exile for the past year and a half. We’re processing the first taste of what it means to begin to take steps back home. Pentecost reminds us that we are not lifeless or helpless. We may not have the words or the wisdom yet, but we have the Spirit, all of us—not just the prophets and priests—we have God’s promised strength to discern, re-enter, re-gather and re-engage.

More love,

Scot+
Supply Priest

REMINDER: The re-opening task force will be giving an update and hosting a discussion this coming Sunday, May 23rd, 11:45AM (regular Sunday Morning Worship link). All are welcome!

05/21/2021

Gubbio will be opening soon at #StJohnsintheMission! Please go to @thegubbioproject for more details and also info on their campaign to raise funds for these new cots for safe and #sacredsleep.

#MoreLove #MasAmor

Gubbio will be opening soon at #StJohnsintheMission! Please go to @thegubbioproject for more details and also info on their campaign to raise funds for these new cots for safe and #sacredsleep.

#MoreLove #MasAmor

Photos from The Episcopal Church of Saint John the Evangelist's post 05/17/2021

This past Sunday it was our privilege to host @revrhinaramos and the Ministerio Latino, an Oakland-based UCC ministry with and for 🏳️‍🌈LGBTQIA+ Latino/a/x folks, especially immigrants. The Reverenda Rhina needed a Covid-safe place in San Francisco to baptize Reynaldo, a young, gay, immigrant man in her congregation who fervently desired to be baptized. We are so glad that our beautiful garden could be that place!

Reynaldo, welcome! 💜

#MoreLove #MasAmor #stjohnsinthemission

05/15/2021

By Zoom or Room, Everyone is Welcome

Many have expressed a need to return to in-person worship as vaccinations progress and case numbers decline. Some have expressed a desire to continue to meet virtually. In accordance with our community’s desire to be “radically welcoming” and not exclude anyone as we reopen the Church, the Bishop’s Committee (BC) has approved the expansion of our offerings to both online and in-person to accommodate everyone.

On June 6, all are welcome to attend a planned worship in the Saint John’s Garden or attend via Zoom. We are still developing our plans, but I can assure you all safety regulations will be adhered to, and clear communication will be provided as we work through the details. At this moment, I’d like to share some information that will soon be elaborated on in a more robust FAQ:

Michael Mallory is leading the charge to ensure that we abide by the safety protocols required by the Diocese of California (DioCal), the city of San Francisco and the State of California. His efforts are bolstered by John Brett, Lydia Bransten (Gubbio’s Executive Director) and Calder Lorenz (Gubbio’s Director of Operations). Additionally, we have identified members of our parish who have successfully re-opened programing and offices.

Officials from the Department of Health visited Saint John’s last week and met with staff members from the church and Gubbio. They walked through the building and gave explicit instructions about what is required. They gave us approval to move forward with plans to re-open for inside services and programing.

--Michael Mallory and John Brett have committed to serving with us every Sunday at in-person worship the next several months to ensure a smooth transition. Both are well versed in the safety protocols required for this transition and also have training in serving our community.

--Contact tracing will be required and is now a routine part of pandemic response processes. Almost everyone who joins us is reachable by either cellphone or email. Planning has already begun to utilize technology to make this step as simple as possible.

--Masks will be required (as of May 12 guidance), and masks will be made available to anyone who requires one. The taskforce will monitor the needs of our parish alongside the mask guidelines as they change and modify mask requirements if necessary. There will not be temperature checks, requirements for vaccines or proof of vaccines.

--We will maintain our values and do not aim to turn anyone away. If someone expresses that they are feeling unwell, a staff member will assist them with finding services that can help them.

--Physical distances of 6 feet for those not in the same household will be adhered to when individuals are onsite at Saint John’s.

--Protocols for cleaning, capacity restrictions, and entering/ exiting as prescribed by DioCal / Health Officials will be maintained. Information about how this will be handled at Saint John’s will be included in the detailed plans provided in the coming weeks.

--Physical Communion will take place. We anticipate offering baked bread and wine (in individual cups). Expansion of Eucharistic Visits are being explored.

--Passing the Peace will not be quite the same (without shaking hands or hugging)! Yet, I know that Saint John’s will make it even more exuberant with elbow shakes, bowing, etc.

--The Music component of in-person worship is being evaluated. There will be music for our worship. Those in the garden can speak, chant or sing as long as they are masked.

--In lieu of our traditional coffee hour, I encourage you to join in fellowship either via Zoom opportunities listed below or in the garden Monday – Friday when Gubbio opens the garden with coffee and water during the week.

--Livestreaming will be a part of Saint John’s Services moving forward (thank you Daniel for making this happen)

--Starting May 23, there will be a Zoom setup in the garden to enable those without their own Zoom access to join us.

--We have created an opportunity (with more to come) for those of you who’d like to share your thoughts, concerns, responses, and ideas with members of the task force. The date is: Sunday, May 23 at 11:45 am (regular Sunday worship link).

I want to again thank all those working tirelessly on this transition. I humbly request your grace and patience as these plans are developed, evaluated, and communicated in the coming weeks. We, of course, will continue over this time to seek your input and feedback. Our intent was to regather in person, if possible, yet this pandemic is continuing well into its second year. As we navigate continued change, transitions and long for times before March 2020, I chuckle a bit imaging Leonardo’s Last Supper via Zoom. The good news is: there is room and Zoom for us all at our table. Let us enhance and deepen the communion of believers not only with Christ but also with one another whether it is by Zoom or in person.

“The table of the Lord is now made ready for those who want to draw near to God in love. Come whether you have great faith or little. Come whether you have been here long or for a short while. Come whether you have tried to follow and stumbled or have just begun the journey. Come, because it is Christ who bids you welcome, for these are the gifts of God for the people of God. Thanks be to God.”

~Elizabeth Orbison

By Zoom or Room, Everyone is Welcome

Many have expressed a need to return to in-person worship as vaccinations progress and case numbers decline. Some have expressed a desire to continue to meet virtually. In accordance with our community’s desire to be “radically welcoming” and not exclude anyone as we reopen the Church, the Bishop’s Committee (BC) has approved the expansion of our offerings to both online and in-person to accommodate everyone.

On June 6, all are welcome to attend a planned worship in the Saint John’s Garden or attend via Zoom. We are still developing our plans, but I can assure you all safety regulations will be adhered to, and clear communication will be provided as we work through the details. At this moment, I’d like to share some information that will soon be elaborated on in a more robust FAQ:

Michael Mallory is leading the charge to ensure that we abide by the safety protocols required by the Diocese of California (DioCal), the city of San Francisco and the State of California. His efforts are bolstered by John Brett, Lydia Bransten (Gubbio’s Executive Director) and Calder Lorenz (Gubbio’s Director of Operations). Additionally, we have identified members of our parish who have successfully re-opened programing and offices.

Officials from the Department of Health visited Saint John’s last week and met with staff members from the church and Gubbio. They walked through the building and gave explicit instructions about what is required. They gave us approval to move forward with plans to re-open for inside services and programing.

--Michael Mallory and John Brett have committed to serving with us every Sunday at in-person worship the next several months to ensure a smooth transition. Both are well versed in the safety protocols required for this transition and also have training in serving our community.

--Contact tracing will be required and is now a routine part of pandemic response processes. Almost everyone who joins us is reachable by either cellphone or email. Planning has already begun to utilize technology to make this step as simple as possible.

--Masks will be required (as of May 12 guidance), and masks will be made available to anyone who requires one. The taskforce will monitor the needs of our parish alongside the mask guidelines as they change and modify mask requirements if necessary. There will not be temperature checks, requirements for vaccines or proof of vaccines.

--We will maintain our values and do not aim to turn anyone away. If someone expresses that they are feeling unwell, a staff member will assist them with finding services that can help them.

--Physical distances of 6 feet for those not in the same household will be adhered to when individuals are onsite at Saint John’s.

--Protocols for cleaning, capacity restrictions, and entering/ exiting as prescribed by DioCal / Health Officials will be maintained. Information about how this will be handled at Saint John’s will be included in the detailed plans provided in the coming weeks.

--Physical Communion will take place. We anticipate offering baked bread and wine (in individual cups). Expansion of Eucharistic Visits are being explored.

--Passing the Peace will not be quite the same (without shaking hands or hugging)! Yet, I know that Saint John’s will make it even more exuberant with elbow shakes, bowing, etc.

--The Music component of in-person worship is being evaluated. There will be music for our worship. Those in the garden can speak, chant or sing as long as they are masked.

--In lieu of our traditional coffee hour, I encourage you to join in fellowship either via Zoom opportunities listed below or in the garden Monday – Friday when Gubbio opens the garden with coffee and water during the week.

--Livestreaming will be a part of Saint John’s Services moving forward (thank you Daniel for making this happen)

--Starting May 23, there will be a Zoom setup in the garden to enable those without their own Zoom access to join us.

--We have created an opportunity (with more to come) for those of you who’d like to share your thoughts, concerns, responses, and ideas with members of the task force. The date is: Sunday, May 23 at 11:45 am (regular Sunday worship link).

I want to again thank all those working tirelessly on this transition. I humbly request your grace and patience as these plans are developed, evaluated, and communicated in the coming weeks. We, of course, will continue over this time to seek your input and feedback. Our intent was to regather in person, if possible, yet this pandemic is continuing well into its second year. As we navigate continued change, transitions and long for times before March 2020, I chuckle a bit imaging Leonardo’s Last Supper via Zoom. The good news is: there is room and Zoom for us all at our table. Let us enhance and deepen the communion of believers not only with Christ but also with one another whether it is by Zoom or in person.

“The table of the Lord is now made ready for those who want to draw near to God in love. Come whether you have great faith or little. Come whether you have been here long or for a short while. Come whether you have tried to follow and stumbled or have just begun the journey. Come, because it is Christ who bids you welcome, for these are the gifts of God for the people of God. Thanks be to God.”

~Elizabeth Orbison

Our Story

Located around the corner from the busy Mission-16th Street-Valencia corridors in San Francisco’s north Mission District, St. John’s has been described by many as an oasis not only for the tranquility of our garden amidst the surrounding bustling streets, or the warm golden light that fills our soaring nave on a sunny day, but because so many have found St. John’s to be a place of loving peace, healing, and renewal in an often all-too-broken world.

On weekdays from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. (Tuesdays until noon), our church space is used by our co-ministry partner, The Gubbio Project (https://www.facebook.com/thegubbioproject/) to provide a safe shelter for “sacred sleep” for about 100 guests. In addition to being a place to rest and restore, Gubbio offers toiletries, a listening ear, referral for services and clothes, clean and safe bathrooms, and blankets, hats, gloves, and socks when available, plus interfaith chaplaincy services, foot care from a registered nurse, and more on different of the week. Gubbio also provides breakfast to over 80 guests every Friday.

Our mission is to live, love, and serve in the hope and joy of the risen Christ.

The Episcopal Church of Saint John the Evangelist is a community of faith, welcoming people of all colors, sexual orientation, and gender identities. Our mission is to live, love, and serve in the hope and joy of the Resurrection, to be in a positive, life-affirming, growing spiritual community, to minister to the neighborhood and greater city in their needs and concerns, and to empower our members with a sense of their Christian stewardship through liturgy, prayer, education and celebration.

Videos (show all)

Saying Yes and meaning it.
Whistleblowing

Location

Products

To visit us: St. John’s is located at the corner of 15th Street and Julian Avenue in San Francisco’s north Mission District. Our main entrance is on Julian. Wheelchair access is available on Julian Avenue. While that gate is open for Sunday services, please call the parish ahead of time if you need wheelchair access for other events so that we can ensure that the pedestrian gate is open when you arrive.

The church is located one short block west and one block north of the 16th Street/Mission BART station. Several Muni bus lines pass nearby: 14-Mission, 22-Fillmore, 26-Valencia, 33-Stanyan, and 49-Van Ness/Mission.

Parking may be found for free on Julian, there is metered parking on other surrounding streets, and public garage on Hoff Street, one block south (parallel and between Valencia and Mission, and 16th and 17th). In addition, there is evening and weekend paid parking in the lots of the bank on the corner of Julian and 16th and on 14th Street between Valencia and Mission. The white zone on 15th Street may be used for brief periods for passenger unloading.

Telephone

Address


1661 15th Street And Julian St
San Francisco, CA
94103
Other Episcopal Churches in San Francisco (show all)
Grace Cathedral Choir of Men and Boys Grace Cathedral Choir of Men and Boys
1100 California St
San Francisco, 94108

Check back for regular updates about upcoming repertoire and special performances by the Grace Cathedral Choir of Men and Boys!

Commission for Creation Care - Diocese of California Commission for Creation Care - Diocese of California
1055 Taylor Street
San Francisco, 94108

Grace Cathedral, San Francisco Grace Cathedral, San Francisco
1100 California Street
San Francisco, 94108

Grace Cathedral is an Episcopal church in the heart of San Francisco. To support the health of our community the cathedral is closed, but love, peace, hope and the arts live on at Grace. *Join us online and stay connected* www.gracecathedral.org

Oasis California Oasis California
St. Cyprian's Church, 2097 Turk Blvd.
San Francisco, 94115

A center of spirituality for LGBT people and their allies in the Bay Area. Check back for news.

100 McAllister Street 100 McAllister Street
San Francisco

The Episcopal Church of the Incarnation The Episcopal Church of the Incarnation
1750 29th Ave
San Francisco, 94122

Incarnation Episcopal Church welcomes all seekers wherever you are on your spiritual journey. We are a welcoming, inclusive community in the Sunset district of San Francisco. Services: Sunday at 10 am, Tuesday at 10 am, 2nd Friday (Healing) at 7:30 pm.

St. Aidan's Episcopal Church, San Francisco St. Aidan's Episcopal Church, San Francisco
101 Gold Mine Dr
San Francisco, 94131

A Joyful Community of the Spirit located in Diamond Heights Neighborhood of San Francisco Sunday Services 8 & 10 AM, Wed 6:30PM, M,W,F 7:30 AM; Tue, Th, Sat at 9 AM. All services currently on Zoom. For access, please reach out at [email protected]

St. James Episcopal Church - San Francisco St. James Episcopal Church - San Francisco
4620 California St
San Francisco, 94118-1225

St. James is a progressive, active, and open spiritual community welcoming all who wish to share God's love.

Christ Episcopal Church Sei Ko Kai Christ Episcopal Church Sei Ko Kai
2140 Pierce St
San Francisco, 94115

We were started in 1895 as a church for Japanese-speaking Episcopalians; we are now primarily English-speaking people of Japanese, Chinese and Caucasian heritage. http://seikokai.org

St. Cyprian's Episcopal Church, San Francisco St. Cyprian's Episcopal Church, San Francisco
2097 Turk St
San Francisco, 94115

In the center of the city, on the edge of the neighborhood. "a San Francisco kind of Jesus joint." Creating a community where everyone matters.

Episcopal Diocese of California Episcopal Diocese of California
1055 Taylor St
San Francisco, 94108

A Christian community of Episcopal congregations and organizations in the greater San Francisco Bay Area.

Trinity†St Peter's  Episcopal  Church San Francisco Trinity†St Peter's Episcopal Church San Francisco
1620 Gough Street
San Francisco, 94109-2947

Trinity Episcopal Church was established in 1849 and is the oldest Episcopal church on the Pacific Coast. It is the second oldest congregation in the City. St Peter's was founded in 1867 and is the 5th oldest Episcopal congregation in San Francisco.