Old St Mary's Cathedral

Old St Mary's Cathedral

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Trying to get my friend Milt access to the study this evening, but the zoom link on the web page is an image, not clickable, so you'd have to enter every character by hand. Does anyone have the meeting link as clickable text?
Stop taking Believers post down - what is going on? I will pray the Rosary for the Old St Mary's Cathedrals priest now.
Looking Forward to Mass at Old St. Mary's Cathedral - just look at the time and fly away from evil Yo - just saying - To God is the Glory - may the Holy Spirit enter this church again in Jesus name we pray - One God.
Our own Milt Commons was featured in today's SF Chronicle. He taught both me and my son how to be acolytes.

Just finished our second virtual coffee hour on Zoom. Want to join us? Next Sunday at 9:30am (Pacific time).
I’ll post the information to join us later in the week. Hope to see you next Sunday.
Is there any way you'd be willing to start ringing your bells at 6:55pm on Tuesday, March 31st?
MESSAGE FROM
The Ministry to the Sick & Homebound and the Spiritual Care Ministries of the Cathedral of Saint Mary of the Assumption

On-Line Masses & Spiritual Resources links during the Coronavirus Pandemic:

THE VATICAN: Daily Mass with His Holiness Pope Francis
https://www.vaticannews.va/en/pope-francis/mass-casa-santa-marta.html
Scroll down to view the mass

United States Conference of Catholic Bishops
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M-KF_ZxbkD4

California Catholic Conference:
https://www.cacatholic.org/covid-spiritual-resources

Archdiocese of San Francisco
https://sfarchdiocese.org

Cathedral of Saint Mary of the Assumption
http://smcsf.org/event/concerns-about-coronavirus/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2LRViRNJeX0

Antichrist is a Loser! We Will Defeat the Beast!
Hello, brothers and sisters, we are orthodox art studio in Bulgaria, and make eastern orthodox byzantine icons. We want present part of our icons to you. We make every size and every type of traditional orthodox icons by order.
Thank you for support and "The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you all. Amen." (Romans 16:24)
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Hi everyone. I'm very excited to say that canon lawyer Jennifer Haselberger will be coming to Berkeley to speak on the sexual abuse crisis. She is an incredible advocate with tremendous insight into the problem. I hope you will share this event. Thank you.

https://www.facebook.com/events/381424125974061/
Please support Mark Leno for SF mayor. He has the experience, leadership, and honesty.

Welcome. Old Saint Mary’s is a Roman Catholic church led by the Paulist Fathers for over 100 years. Old St. Mary’s Cathedral + Holy Family Chinese Mission is a unique Paulist Foundation which celebrates cultural diversity, continues the tradition of excellence in Catholic education, and seeks to evangelize in light of the Gospel of Jesus Christ and the teachings of the Catholic Church.

Operating as usual

Bishops and the Eucharist 06/22/2021

Bishops and the Eucharist

Bishops and the Eucharist Wednesday Week 12 in Ordinary Time, June 23, 2021, Scripture: Matthew 7:15-20

06/21/2021
Can We Really See? 06/20/2021

Can We Really See?

Can We Really See? Monday week 12 in ordinary time, June 21, 2021, scripture: Matthew 7:1-5

06/19/2021

TEN THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT MARK’S GOSPEL: A REFLECTION BY PAULIST FATHER JOE SCOTT

It is the shortest gospel. It is so short that it doesn’t last the whole year. During the Summer, we use sections from John’s gospel on the Bread of Life. Mark contains so few chapters that we can do this and still include every bit of this gospel by the year’s end.

It is the first gospel written. Mark is believed to have been composed around the year 70, about 40 years after the time of Jesus. The other three gospels were written at a later date, although Paul’s letters were written before(Paul was martyred around the year 64 so never read any of the gospels).

The gospels of Matthew and Luke use Mark’s gospel as their main source. Much of these two gospels is almost word for word quotes from Mark. The sections borrowed from Mark are almost identical between the two, which shows how much their authors valued Mark’s testimony.

No one knows exactly where Mark’s gospel was written. Some guess Rome because that city had recently been the site for the Emperor Nero’s persecution of the Christians and Mark stresses the persecution followers of Jesus must undergo.

Mark’s gospel reveals the humanness of Jesus. In this gospel Jesus expresses intense emotions, including anger at his disciples and fear in the face of suffering.

In Mark’s gospel Jesus prays to his Father as a greater Being who loves him and who can help him. This contrasts with the gospel of John, where Jesus and the Father are One, and Jesus offers only prayers of thanksgiving.

In this gospel Jesus teaches by action. He shares a few short parables based on nature, but more often Jesus’ disciples witness him heal sick persons and liberate people from evil spirits.—and Jesus invites the 12 to do the same. We learn about Jesus by doing what he does. Mark’s gospel is so action filled and fast paced it can seem like a play or movie!

Mark’s gospel stresses the complete rejection and abandonment of Jesus. He is opposed and misunderstood by the Scribes, the Pharisees, the Sadducees, the followers of Herod, his own disciples and even members of his own family. On the cross, Jesus seems to experience even the abandonment of God, when he cries out, “my God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”

For Mark, the meaning of Jesus lies in his Passion and death. Yes, he was a healer, a wise teacher, a miracle worker., an exorcist, an ethical guide—but to see him as only one or even all of these is to miss the point of his life. Jesus is even secretive about the wonders he works, so that the crowds will discover only what is most important: Jesus came to die that we might have life in him.

Mark’s gospel has no ending. The true ending we have for Mark’s gospel comes in Mark 16:8, when a young man at the tomb tells the disciples, “You seek Jesus of Nazareth, the crucified. He is not here. He is going before you to Galilee, and there you will see him, as he told you.” Mark adds: “Then they went out and fled from the tomb, seized with trembling and bewilderment. They said nothing to anyone, for they were afraid.” This is an unsatisfying ending, completely devoid of paschal joy! Later Christians didn’t like Mark’s ending, so they made two separate “epilogues” to Mark, “happy endings” drawn from the resurrection accounts in Matthew and Luke. But Mark may be telling us, his readers, something important in the incompleteness of his original ending. He may be asking us to supply a better ending, not in words but in faith and action. He challenges us: “they ALL misunderstood him. They ALL rejected him. What about YOU?

TEN THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT MARK’S GOSPEL: A REFLECTION BY PAULIST FATHER JOE SCOTT

It is the shortest gospel. It is so short that it doesn’t last the whole year. During the Summer, we use sections from John’s gospel on the Bread of Life. Mark contains so few chapters that we can do this and still include every bit of this gospel by the year’s end.

It is the first gospel written. Mark is believed to have been composed around the year 70, about 40 years after the time of Jesus. The other three gospels were written at a later date, although Paul’s letters were written before(Paul was martyred around the year 64 so never read any of the gospels).

The gospels of Matthew and Luke use Mark’s gospel as their main source. Much of these two gospels is almost word for word quotes from Mark. The sections borrowed from Mark are almost identical between the two, which shows how much their authors valued Mark’s testimony.

No one knows exactly where Mark’s gospel was written. Some guess Rome because that city had recently been the site for the Emperor Nero’s persecution of the Christians and Mark stresses the persecution followers of Jesus must undergo.

Mark’s gospel reveals the humanness of Jesus. In this gospel Jesus expresses intense emotions, including anger at his disciples and fear in the face of suffering.

In Mark’s gospel Jesus prays to his Father as a greater Being who loves him and who can help him. This contrasts with the gospel of John, where Jesus and the Father are One, and Jesus offers only prayers of thanksgiving.

In this gospel Jesus teaches by action. He shares a few short parables based on nature, but more often Jesus’ disciples witness him heal sick persons and liberate people from evil spirits.—and Jesus invites the 12 to do the same. We learn about Jesus by doing what he does. Mark’s gospel is so action filled and fast paced it can seem like a play or movie!

Mark’s gospel stresses the complete rejection and abandonment of Jesus. He is opposed and misunderstood by the Scribes, the Pharisees, the Sadducees, the followers of Herod, his own disciples and even members of his own family. On the cross, Jesus seems to experience even the abandonment of God, when he cries out, “my God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”

For Mark, the meaning of Jesus lies in his Passion and death. Yes, he was a healer, a wise teacher, a miracle worker., an exorcist, an ethical guide—but to see him as only one or even all of these is to miss the point of his life. Jesus is even secretive about the wonders he works, so that the crowds will discover only what is most important: Jesus came to die that we might have life in him.

Mark’s gospel has no ending. The true ending we have for Mark’s gospel comes in Mark 16:8, when a young man at the tomb tells the disciples, “You seek Jesus of Nazareth, the crucified. He is not here. He is going before you to Galilee, and there you will see him, as he told you.” Mark adds: “Then they went out and fled from the tomb, seized with trembling and bewilderment. They said nothing to anyone, for they were afraid.” This is an unsatisfying ending, completely devoid of paschal joy! Later Christians didn’t like Mark’s ending, so they made two separate “epilogues” to Mark, “happy endings” drawn from the resurrection accounts in Matthew and Luke. But Mark may be telling us, his readers, something important in the incompleteness of his original ending. He may be asking us to supply a better ending, not in words but in faith and action. He challenges us: “they ALL misunderstood him. They ALL rejected him. What about YOU?

06/19/2021

Fr. Tom is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: Sunday Coffee Hour
Time: Sunday, ###### 9:30-10:30 AM PDT

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85492836513?pwd=UGVwRUVBTXk3RnRxZVB4c3d5dFhCUT09

Meeting ID: 854 9283 6513
Passcode: 003859

Fr. Tom is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: Sunday Coffee Hour
Time: Sunday, ###### 9:30-10:30 AM PDT

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85492836513?pwd=UGVwRUVBTXk3RnRxZVB4c3d5dFhCUT09

Meeting ID: 854 9283 6513
Passcode: 003859

Not a Care in the World 06/18/2021

Not a Care in the World

Not a Care in the World 12th Sunday in Ordinary Time, June 20, 2021, Scripture: Job 38:1,8-11, Mark 4:35-41

Small is Huge 06/17/2021

Small is Huge

Small is Huge Friday Week 11 in Ordinary Time, June19, 2021, Scripture: Matthew 6:19-23

Pure Joy 06/16/2021

Pure Joy

Pure Joy Wednesday June 16, 2021Matthew 6:1-6,16-18

06/14/2021

SO WHAT DO BIRDS AND MUSTARD SEEDS HAVE TO DO WITH US?
A REFLECTION BY PAULIST FR. JOE SCOTT

Something VERY small—a mustard seed---becomes very large.

A traditional interpretation of this story is that Jesus is talking about the church.

On Holy Thursday the number of Jesus’ followers went from twelve to eleven. On Good Friday it dropped down to two, and one was his mother. Not a promising direction!

Yet Catholics look proudly today at a membership of 1.2 billion worldwide.

Would Jesus feel proud of this growth? He doesn’t seem to be that interested in big numbers. If he were, he might have chosen the tall, majestic cedar for this parable. In comparison, the mustard tree is not that big. It’s not that valuable either. It’s a kind of bush!

What interested Jesus was not the size of the tree but the large number and variety of its branches.

Jesus remembered that the prophet Ezekiel had spoken about a tree with so many branches that “birds of every kind could dwell beneath it.”

Ezekiel was a prophet of the Exile. He lived and wrote in Babylon, where-- like many of the exiled Jews -- he saw that Babylonians and Assyrians and Egyptians were not monsters. There were good people among them who welcomed and helped the Jews survive as strangers in a strange land. As different as they were, it would not be so surprising if God would invite Gentiles to a branch on the tree of eternal life.

The birds of every kind Ezekiel spoke of were people of every nation and language and custom and color. The tree the God of Israel had planted could find a life-giving place for all of them. “Every kind” does not admit the possibility that anyone must be excluded.

So when Jesus is speaking of the mustard tree whose branches can be home for many birds, he’s talking about the kingdom of God welcoming Jews, but also Samaritans and Greeks and Chinese and Congolese and Americans.

Jesus’ words are a challenge for us today. Can we love those who are different from us, especially in ways that might provoke or upset us. Can we find ways to delight in them, just as Jesus could delight in imagining the kaleidoscope wings of the parrot and the bright red feathers of the cardinal and the modest brown of the wren? A tree of many branches is a home where everyone is welcome. Do we believe this? Can we live this?

SO WHAT DO BIRDS AND MUSTARD SEEDS HAVE TO DO WITH US?
A REFLECTION BY PAULIST FR. JOE SCOTT

Something VERY small—a mustard seed---becomes very large.

A traditional interpretation of this story is that Jesus is talking about the church.

On Holy Thursday the number of Jesus’ followers went from twelve to eleven. On Good Friday it dropped down to two, and one was his mother. Not a promising direction!

Yet Catholics look proudly today at a membership of 1.2 billion worldwide.

Would Jesus feel proud of this growth? He doesn’t seem to be that interested in big numbers. If he were, he might have chosen the tall, majestic cedar for this parable. In comparison, the mustard tree is not that big. It’s not that valuable either. It’s a kind of bush!

What interested Jesus was not the size of the tree but the large number and variety of its branches.

Jesus remembered that the prophet Ezekiel had spoken about a tree with so many branches that “birds of every kind could dwell beneath it.”

Ezekiel was a prophet of the Exile. He lived and wrote in Babylon, where-- like many of the exiled Jews -- he saw that Babylonians and Assyrians and Egyptians were not monsters. There were good people among them who welcomed and helped the Jews survive as strangers in a strange land. As different as they were, it would not be so surprising if God would invite Gentiles to a branch on the tree of eternal life.

The birds of every kind Ezekiel spoke of were people of every nation and language and custom and color. The tree the God of Israel had planted could find a life-giving place for all of them. “Every kind” does not admit the possibility that anyone must be excluded.

So when Jesus is speaking of the mustard tree whose branches can be home for many birds, he’s talking about the kingdom of God welcoming Jews, but also Samaritans and Greeks and Chinese and Congolese and Americans.

Jesus’ words are a challenge for us today. Can we love those who are different from us, especially in ways that might provoke or upset us. Can we find ways to delight in them, just as Jesus could delight in imagining the kaleidoscope wings of the parrot and the bright red feathers of the cardinal and the modest brown of the wren? A tree of many branches is a home where everyone is welcome. Do we believe this? Can we live this?

Call them Out 06/13/2021

Call them Out

Call them Out Monday Week 12 in Ordinary Time, June 13, 2021, Scripture: Matthew 5:38-42

06/12/2021

Kingston Cares

Eleventh Sunday in Ordinary Time 06/11/2021

Eleventh Sunday in Ordinary Time

Eleventh Sunday in Ordinary Time June `1: 2021, Scr;ipture:John 19:31-37

Walk for Latte 06/11/2021

Walk for Latte

Walk for Latte Walking along Grant Street thru Chinatown in San Francisco to Trieste Cafe

Feast of the Sacred Heart 06/10/2021

Feast of the Sacred Heart

Feast of the Sacred Heart Friday Week 11: June 10, 2021, Scripture: Hosea 11:1,3-4,8-9, Ephesians 3:8-12,14-19, John 19:31-37

Walk for Latte 06/10/2021

Walk for Latte

Took a walk this morning for a Latte...

Walk for Latte Walking along Grant Street thru Chinatown in San Francisco to Trieste Cafe

06/10/2021

Fr. Tom Tavella is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: Bible study
Time: Thursday, June 10 7:00PM PST

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87182521910?pwd=cURzUVYvSDBGd2ZqVGFibThEdFgyZz09

Meeting ID: 871 8252 1910
Passcode: 332406

Fr. Tom Tavella is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: Bible study
Time: Thursday, June 10 7:00PM PST

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87182521910?pwd=cURzUVYvSDBGd2ZqVGFibThEdFgyZz09

Meeting ID: 871 8252 1910
Passcode: 332406

Law = Death 06/08/2021

Law = Death

Law = Death Wednesday Week 11 in Ordinary Time, June 9, 2021, Scripture: 2 Corinthians 3:4-11

Law = Death 06/08/2021

Law = Death

Law = Death Wednesday Week 11 in Ordinary Time, June 9, 2021, Scripture: 2 Corinthians 3:4-11

Pope: Eucharist is bread of sinners, not reward of saints 06/07/2021

Pope: Eucharist is bread of sinners, not reward of saints

Pope: Eucharist is bread of sinners, not reward of saints People's hearts and the entire church must be wide open to wonder and devotion to Christ and ready to embrace everyone — sinner and saint alike, Pope Francis said. "The church of the perfect and pu...

Live Like Salt and Light 06/07/2021

Live Like Salt and Light

Live Like Salt and Light Tuesday Week 11 in Ordinary Time, June 8, 2021, Scripture: Matthew 5:13-16

To Be or not To Be? 06/06/2021

To Be or not To Be?

To Be or not To Be? Monday Week 11 in Ordinary Time, June 7, 2021, Scripture: Matthew 5:1-12

06/05/2021

WHO’S WORTHY OF THE BREAD OF LIFE?

There’s a lot of talk these days about excluding people from the Eucharist. Who’s in, and who’s out?

Jesus wouldn’t sympathize with all the political talk, because he wasn’t a politician. According to John’s gospel, when Jesus fed the five thousand, many in the crowd wanted to make him the new King of Israel. While they were busy looking for a proper crown, Jesus went to hide in the mountains. He didn’t want power and glory, he wanted to feed people.

The story of Jesus feeding the five thousand is the only one found in all four gospels. In fact, Mark and Matthew have two versions, one on the Gentile side of the Sea of Galilee and on the Jewish side. This is a not too subtle hint that Jesus wanted to include everyone, “even”, one gospel informs us, “the women and children.”

Four years ago, I was diagnosed with Coelic Disease, an intolerance for gluten. If I eat wheat, it will make me sick, and perhaps kill me. I’m blessed to be able to tolerate the low-gluten hosts that make it possible for me to celebrate Mass. Many of those suffering from Coelic Disease cannot. When they attend Mass, they can receive the Blood of Christ but not the Body. This has made me appreciate how important the Eucharist is for me and for all who receive it.

Perhaps the greatest tragedy of the Protestant Reformation was the decision by Catholic and Protestant alike to exclude the other from communion. It was like banning half your family from Thanksgiving dinner.

Most of us no longer see Protestant Christians as the enemy. We see them as our neighbor or our co-worker or our spouse or our child or our friend. We now cooperate in many ways with Protestant Churches, and some have welcomed Catholics to their communion table, but we Catholics still hold fast to the belief that perfect communion can only come with uniform belief. We can root for the Giants together on Saturday, but not worship together on Sunday.

I suspect that the opposite is true, that if we were able to join in communion on a regular basis our differences would enrich rather than violate one another. And there are those difficult times when sharing a regular meal may be the only thing that holds a family together.

I believe that arguments about who’s worthy to receive the Eucharist and who isn’t are a dead end. Who of us is worthy, truly? God gave us the Eucharist as a gift and a blessing, a nourishment to be shared, not a prize.

One of the very first things Pope Francis said on becoming bishop of Rome was: “the Eucharist is not a reward for the perfect. It is a food for the hungry and medicine for the sick.”

On the Feast of the Body and Blood of the Lord, we consider the reckless hospitality of Jesus, who makes sure that everyone gets fed no matter whether they are friend or foe. Can we dare to be that generous?

WHO’S WORTHY OF THE BREAD OF LIFE?

There’s a lot of talk these days about excluding people from the Eucharist. Who’s in, and who’s out?

Jesus wouldn’t sympathize with all the political talk, because he wasn’t a politician. According to John’s gospel, when Jesus fed the five thousand, many in the crowd wanted to make him the new King of Israel. While they were busy looking for a proper crown, Jesus went to hide in the mountains. He didn’t want power and glory, he wanted to feed people.

The story of Jesus feeding the five thousand is the only one found in all four gospels. In fact, Mark and Matthew have two versions, one on the Gentile side of the Sea of Galilee and on the Jewish side. This is a not too subtle hint that Jesus wanted to include everyone, “even”, one gospel informs us, “the women and children.”

Four years ago, I was diagnosed with Coelic Disease, an intolerance for gluten. If I eat wheat, it will make me sick, and perhaps kill me. I’m blessed to be able to tolerate the low-gluten hosts that make it possible for me to celebrate Mass. Many of those suffering from Coelic Disease cannot. When they attend Mass, they can receive the Blood of Christ but not the Body. This has made me appreciate how important the Eucharist is for me and for all who receive it.

Perhaps the greatest tragedy of the Protestant Reformation was the decision by Catholic and Protestant alike to exclude the other from communion. It was like banning half your family from Thanksgiving dinner.

Most of us no longer see Protestant Christians as the enemy. We see them as our neighbor or our co-worker or our spouse or our child or our friend. We now cooperate in many ways with Protestant Churches, and some have welcomed Catholics to their communion table, but we Catholics still hold fast to the belief that perfect communion can only come with uniform belief. We can root for the Giants together on Saturday, but not worship together on Sunday.

I suspect that the opposite is true, that if we were able to join in communion on a regular basis our differences would enrich rather than violate one another. And there are those difficult times when sharing a regular meal may be the only thing that holds a family together.

I believe that arguments about who’s worthy to receive the Eucharist and who isn’t are a dead end. Who of us is worthy, truly? God gave us the Eucharist as a gift and a blessing, a nourishment to be shared, not a prize.

One of the very first things Pope Francis said on becoming bishop of Rome was: “the Eucharist is not a reward for the perfect. It is a food for the hungry and medicine for the sick.”

On the Feast of the Body and Blood of the Lord, we consider the reckless hospitality of Jesus, who makes sure that everyone gets fed no matter whether they are friend or foe. Can we dare to be that generous?

Videos (show all)

Fr. Michael Checkin
Easter 2020 - Old St. Mary's Cathedral - San Francisco
Checking in...
Hello from 660 California Street, Old St.Mary's Cathedral
Food for seniors is back!
March of the little ones
Cablecars and Church
A Micro Moment with Father Michael
A movie, yet to be titled is being shot in Hecker Hall.  This scene is of a grief group.
In front of old St. Mary’s Cathedral this morning.
On going ping-pong tournament in our church hall -- drop by if you have a chance...

Location

Telephone

Address


660 California St
San Francisco, CA
94108-2501

General information

Masses: Weekdays: 7:30AM, 12:05PM Saturday: 12:05PM, 5PM Vigil Sunday Masses: 8:00AM 9:15AM (Contemporary Music) 10:15AM (Chinese Mass) 11:15AM (Choir Mass) Holy Days: 7:30AM; 12:05PM; 5:15PM Confession: Monday and Wednesday-Saturday: after 12:05PM Mass Saturday: 4:00-4:30PM Or by appointment anytime
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