The Episcopal Church of Saint Thomas the Apostle (Dallas, Texas)

The Episcopal Church of Saint Thomas the Apostle (Dallas, Texas)

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Thank you again for including me in your services. I like to go to church at 0800...I'm in San Diego, California. We owe it to Dr. Steve Sprinkle that I'm going back-to-church. I met him here at our neighborhood UCC. Jr. (my son Oliver, lol) has a birthday soon. The photo is the two of us in San Francisco last year...♫♪ take me to the river ♫...?
Join us this morning for virtual worship at 10 AM CDT. Send a request to [email protected], and we'll send you a link.
Join us for virtual worship this morning at 10 AM CDT. If you wish to join email [email protected] doubter.org, and you will receive a link to join.
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1E57l8g1T2UpInvbmLfo6bmzjQ_pDXJxq/view?ts=5f30bc33 Here is the sermon I preached Sunday morning for the Episcopal Church of St. Thomas the Apostle, Dallas, TX: "Water-Walking Jesus." The gospel text is Matthew 14:22-33. I cannot thank Rob Rodriguez enough for his skill and determination to get this file moved from the Cloud to this space. I hope there is something of the true Good News here for you. ✝️ ~ Dr. Stephen V. Sprinkle, Theologian-in-Residence
I don't have id or password Martha
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PRAYERS NEEDED FOR GEORGE KRIEGER IN the HOSPITAL SPEEDY RECOVERY AMEN.
We were mentioned tonight on KERA! Come get your ashes tomorrow!
I wanted to express my appreciation to St. Thomas the Apostle Community. Years ago my uncle, Mark Sappenfield was a member from what I know. He was diagnosed with ALS and became homebound. I understand that the church community helped him in many different ways. We did not have a connection, since I was 9 years old, due to family misunderstanding. Uncle Mark was able to connect with us through the pastor at St. Thomas Apostle. Soon members of my family flew to Dallas and visited him in the hospital. I was able to connect with him due to your church community. I can’t thank those who brought us together before his passing. Sincerely.
It's going to be a historic and glorious day. Celebrating and renewing the vows of 9 couples who have previously been married. Now they are able to do it in their own church, before God, family, and friends. January 20, 2019 To the people of God at the Church of St. Thomas the Apostle: At last! Today, Episcopalians across our church rejoice with you that justice has finally come to the Church of St. Thomas the Apostle. My prayers are with all of you, and especially with faithful LGBTQ Episcopalians who for far too long have been asked to bear the burden of the church’s historic struggle to embrace the Gospel promise of inclusion. For those of you whose unions are blessed today, I realize that the celebration cannot fully compensate for the sadness of being unable to be married in your own church. But I pray that your joy in today’s celebration rests in the knowledge that you are making history as you renew your vows in the sight of God and one another. As I rejoice with you, I remember with particular gratitude the saints who labored for decades to bring God’s justice to God’s church, including those who went on before us without seeing their dream come true today. Your parish has a long and rich history of witnessing to the power and beauty of God’s love for every person without exception. Your witness is a beacon of light that shines brightly. I send you my warmest greetings and my great gratitude for your witness, your faith, and the rich and wonderful evidence of God’s blessing in your commitment to one another and to our beloved church. Faithfully, Gay C Jennings President of the House of Deputies
In the news

Our doors are open to all. This is the inclusiveness that distinguishes our church's past and promises to further enrich its future. Service Times Sunday: Rite One Eucharist - 8:00 am Rite Two Eucharist - 10:00 am Wednesday: Evening Eucharist Service - 6:30 pm

Mission: Helping Hands Healing Hearts Welcome All

Operating as usual

Everyone is invited to join us for a new Wednesday Workshop Series, Evangelism 101: Learning to tell our sacred stories. Talking about our faith can be difficult. Let’s explore it together each Wednesday from Jan 13-Feb 3 at 6 pm on Zoom. Series hosted by Seminarian Allen and no reading required! If you have questions, email [email protected]

Consecrated Hosts for January 3rd - April 4th are now available. They will be in a new box on a small bench near the door to the Church’s office. There will be fourteen (14) hosts in each small plastic bag. Take one bag for each person in your home. If you are unable to go by the church due to health or transportation issues, please notify [email protected] or call 321-482-0136 (please leave a message with your request and arrangements will be made to get them to you.)

Because of the generosity of the parishioners of St. Thomas, an Outreach Grant was given to Christmas Toys for Dallas Children in Need, and many children received a much appreciated bicycle.

Longtime member Tim Chaney “selfies-up” with #BlackLivesMatter at St Thomas the Apostle!

Don’t miss out! Swing by and get in the picture!

Way to go Tim!

As God shines brightly among us, again and always, a very bright and happy Christmas from the Rector, Clergy, Vestry, and Parish of The Episcopal Church of St Thomas the Apostle, Dallas!

Please take a moment to congratulate our newly minted Rector Emeritus, the 3rd Rector of the Episcopal Church of St Thomas the Apostle, the Rev. Stephen J Waller!

It is a joy that the 5th Rector, Wardens, Vestry, and Parish are excited to share!

The Church is ready for the arrival of Immanuel, God among us! Wherever you are on life’s journey, please plan to join us to celebrate the great miracle of God’s in-breaking of light into the darkness. Nothing will ever be the same!

Christmas Eve, Thursday, December 24: 7:30 pm CST
Christmas Day, Friday, December 25: 10 am CST

E-mail [email protected] for the Zoom link!

All are welcome!

Our Theologian-in-Residence The Rev Dr Steve Sprinkle “selfies” with the Rector in standing with our Vestry and Parish to boldly proclaim that #BlackLivesMatter!

If you haven’t made yours yet, today is a great day to swing by the Church and “selfie up!” Just be sure to “check-in” at St Thomas the Apostle, Dallas!

The Episcopal Church of St Thomas the Apostle has proclaimed loudly and boldly, through word and deed, that #BlackLivesMatter. And now we want all our Doubters (and friends alike!) to get in on the act with us!

Stop by the Church at Inwood and Mockingbird in Dallas, and “selfie-up” with our banner signage, and post to your FaceBook page, “checking-in” at St Thomas so that the world will know that you too doubt powers and principalities with the Doubters of St Thomas in proclaiming that #BlackLivesMatter!

Our Rector and Ruth Woodward lead us off!

Here's something fun for Friday night! Dec. 11 at 7PM, tune into "Holidays Unmuted" with the Turtle Creek Chorale. The show will stream FREE on their page and YouTube channel. “Holidays Unmuted” — whose title is a reference to the mute function on Zoom and its many misuses. This virtual event will be different from their previous in-person holiday shows, but it will maintain the cheeky humor, upbeat tone, and, of course, excellent music for which their shows are known. Beloved local actor, B.J. Cleveland, will host the show as Liza Minelli and the format of the program will be a throwback to television holiday specials from the 1960s. They will close the show by honoring lost members and perform “Silent Night” in sign language. Tune in!

Mark your calendars for our Christmas Zoom services:
• Thursday, Dec. 24 at 7:30pm – Join us early for a special selection of music prior to the Christmas Eve Mass.
• Thursday, Dec. 24 at 8:00pm – Christmas Eve Mass.
• Friday, Dec. 25 at 10:00am – Christmas Day Mass.

A unique zoom link will be sent out for each service. If you’d like to receive the Zoom link, please email Father Christopher at [email protected].

Every child has a right to thrive, no matter what! In a world where special needs children face limited options in life, Bryan’s House empowers families by removing barriers to care, serving children through education, health, advocacy and social services. Their medically-trained caregivers also meet the needs of children with cerebral palsy, autism, Down Syndrome, and more. Please consider making a donation to Bryan’s House to help at-risk children with special needs in North Texas. Go to: http://www.bryanshouse.org/donate-now/

Only a few days left! Help us in supporting Community Partners of Dallas' Virtual Toy Drive to give toys go to children in need throughout Dallas. Simply go to https://www.helpcpdkids.org and select the wishes you would like to fill (deadline is this Friday, Dec. 11). Wishes range from $10 to $34 each. When you checkout, find the spot that asks if you are filling wishes for a group and enter “St. Thomas the Apostle”.

“I Moan Like a Lonely Bird on a Roof”

On Saturday, November 14, 2020, the Episcopal Church of St Thomas the Apostle held a “Liturgy of Lament” on behalf of our parish, our community, our city, and the world around us, to grieve all that has been lost in this year of 2020, as a way to begin to find hope in new beginnings.

It was a poignant service punctuated by remembrances of each of the senses that have been taken away by COVID-19 during this “Corona-tide,” culminating with the burning of our lamentations as an offering to God.

Please enjoy the meditation on Psalm 77, the cornerstone of our lament, by our own Theologian-in-Residence, the Rev Dr Steve Sprinkle.

Looking for some unique gift ideas? Honduras Threads is the perfect opportunity to do a little online gift shopping and support a good cause. Browse their beautiful collections at: https://hondurasthreads.org/collections

Doing some cyber Monday shopping today? Please help us in supporting Community Partners of Dallas' Virtual Toy Drive to give toys go to children in need throughout Dallas. Simply go to https://www.helpcpdkids.org and select the wishes you would like to fill (deadline is Dec. 11). Wishes range from $10 to $34 each. When you checkout, find the spot that asks if you are filling wishes for a group and enter “St. Thomas the Apostle”.

We wish everyone a safe and Happy Thanksgiving!

Due to the rising Covid-19 numbers, there will NOT be any in-person services until further notice. Please stay safe, wear a mask and wash hands frequently!

Though the cameras are gone, Black lives STILL matter to the Doubters at Inwood & Mockingbird. The signs are placed along Inwood Rd.

If you agree that #BlackLivesMatter, drive by, snap a picture and tag us/check in!

It's Toy Drive time again! Please help us in supporting Community Partners of Dallas' Virtual Toy Drive to give toys go to children in need throughout Dallas. No need to go to stores to shop for the toys, instead go to https://www.helpcpdkids.org and select the wishes you would like to fill. It’s super simple to do! Wishes this year range in price from $10 to $34 each. When you checkout, find the spot that asks if you are filling wishes for a group and enter “St. Thomas the Apostle” so we can see how many of us participate! Share the love by December 11.

On Wednesday, Nov. 18 at Noon we will offer our next in-person, indoor Eucharist following safety guidelines. Service will be conducted in the Parish Hall, where all social-distancing and proper ventilation can be implemented. Please enter via the Parish Hall North Doors only. There will be a limit of 20 people. If you plan to attend, please email [email protected] by Tues, Nov. 17. Masks are required. The service will be a spoken (no singing) mass. There is to be no physical touching – hugs, handshakes, fist bumps, etc., during the Peace. Please note, bathrooms will not be open during this time. The Sunday Zoom church offering remains our primary gathering of the community body, and we encourage everyone’s ongoing attendance and support.

edod.org

Episcopal Diocese of Dallas

The Episcopal Diocese of Dallas is hosting a Cost of Covid-19 Experience for all those throughout the EDOD Diocese. The 90-minute interactive ZOOM call will be on Tuesday, Nov. 17 from 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM. To sign up, e-mail Kim LaNore at [email protected] by Nov. 15 to receive the Zoom link. Learn more at:
https://edod.org/event/1906663-2020-11-17-cost-of-covid-experience-seminar-via-zoom-open-to-all-in-the-diocese/

edod.org Cost of COVID Experience Seminar via Zoom-Open to All in the DioceseTuesday, November 17, 2020, 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM Download: Download EventThe Episcopal Diocese of Dallas is hosting a Cost of Covid-19 Experience for all those throughout the EDOD Diocese. Cost of COVID Experience is a unique, 90-minu...

Join us on Saturday, Nov. 14, at 10 am in the North Parking Lot, for an outdoor service, “A Liturgy of Lament” – we offer our community the space to lament all that we have lost during the last nine months, before and beyond. All of the grievances, all of the sorrows, all of the losses, angers, hurts, fears, we bring them all in the form of lament to place on God’s altar. We will process and witness signs and symbols of our God, leaning into hope through the ashes. We will write our laments and offer them up to God in fire. (Masks and social distancing required. If it rains, the event will be cancelled.)

Traditionally Honduras Threads has a Pop-Up shop during our Thanksgiving Potluck luncheon, which is a perfect opportunity to do a little gift shopping, and support a good cause. Like so many other things this year, shopping will have to be virtual! Browse their beautiful collections at: https://hondurasthreads.org/collections

Beginning next week, Wednesday, Nov. 11, we will offer an in-person, indoor Eucharist following plans and precautions our Regathering Committee has studied and put into place. This weekly Noon Eucharist service will be conducted in the Parish Hall, where all social-distancing and proper ventilation can be implemented. (Please enter via the Parish Hall North Doors only.)

If you are going to attend this service, please email [email protected] prior to Wednesday so that we can adequately prepare. Masks are required. The service will be a spoken (no singing) mass. There is to be no physical touching - hugs, handshakes, fist bumps, etc., during the Peace. The Peace may be exchanged verbally or with a head nod, for example. ** Please note, bathrooms will not be open during this time. ** The Sunday Zoom church offering remains our primary gathering of the community body, and we encourage everyone’s ongoing attendance and support.

Consecrated hosts for November will be available after 10:00 am on Friday, Oct. 30. They will be in a box on a small bench near the door to the Church’s office. There will be four (4) hosts in each small plastic bag. Take one bag for each person in your home. If you are unable to go by the church due to health or transportation issues, please notify us at [email protected] or 321-482-0136. Please leave a message with your request and arrangements will be made to get them to you.

The Desire to Love

Seminarian Allen Michael Junek brought us today’s homily—teach us, Lord, to love!

——

Sermon text:

+ In the name of the one holy and undivided Trinity. Amen.

So, here he is: Jesus as he’s so often portrayed. A wise sage on the mountain top, telling each of us to be nice to each other.

You know this is one of the downfalls of the lectionary, the table by which we choose the readings for each Sunday of the year: we don’t always get the whole story, just a piece of it.

Prior to this exchange, Jesus had just entered Jerusalem. It was the Tuesday, of what we would call Holy Week. The crowds that shouted “Hosanna” on Sunday, would be shouting “Crucify” by Friday. He had just purged the Temple with a whip made of his own hands, and was now being quizzed about authority, taxes, marriage, and now by a lawyer, the Law.

Which law is the greatest?

Just as in all the other cases, Jesus answers rightly. You are to love God, but it is not enough to just love God alone. It’s not that simple. “Love God,” Jesus says--the Source of all Goodness, Truth, and Beauty--”this is the first and greatest commandment.”

Wait.

Did you hear that? He said, “the first.”

Can you just imagine the collective inhale the scribes and teachers must’ve had when they heard this qualifier? Maybe this is actually a miracles story--the miracle of Jesus still being able to breathe when all the oxygen had been sucked out of the room. You see, a first implies a second.

“And the second is like it, love your neighbor as your very self.”

These two commandments sound simple, yet sometimes I’m afraid that I’ve grown used to them. Let us never forget that they have teeth: they are tough and costly.

Today, in a country such as our own, to love our neighbor usually requires two things: (1) suspending our judgement and (2) a checkbook.

Do we want food on our plate and a roof over our head?
Do we want medical care and education without the threat crippling debt?
Do we want our children and grandchildren to be all that they can be?

“You shall want the same for your neighbor,” Jesus says.

“But who is my neighbor, Jesus?”

In Luke’s telling of this same story, we are launched into the parable of the Good Samaritan whereby we learn that our neighbors are not the ones who look, and live, and love, and pray as we do. I hope that isn’t new information: that we are all connected as one human family. The past 6 months should have made this abundantly clear.

At this point perhaps you’re saying “Well I know--we know--who our neighbors are, and we don’t need some seminarian coming in here to tell us what we already know!”

And you would be right. You don’t need me to remind you that your neighbor is that couple across the street with a political yard sign not of your choosing.

I’m not going to tell you that your neighbor is that person whom you care for deeply, who sees your life of faith, and is left to wonder why you don’t invite them into that life as well.

And I absolutely, positively would not dream of telling you that Jesus might very well say to us, “Love Donald Trump as you love yourself,” or “Love Joe Biden as you love yourself.”

Chances are that if you’ve been living above ground for the past year or so, one or both of these names sparked a near visceral reaction in you. I know it did for me.

And so, if I’m not here to tell you those things, then what I am here to tell you is, not whom to choose when you vote, but to pay attention. Pay attention to that reaction when you hear those names, because it will tell you something. That feeling in your gut, the tightening of your chest, that clenched fist, is what you’re leaving behind when you choose to follow Jesus. It is no longer just about you and those you choose to love.

The call to “love our neighbors” without specificity, is inspiring, but the call to apply it to our particular neighbors is pretty lackluster.

Instead of inquiring among ourselves about “finding solutions to homelessness” in general--which, don’t get me wrong, it has systemic dimensions as well--but what does the Great Commandment have to say about my responsibility to an unhoused person sleeping in my alley behind my house. What does it have to say about what I do in that moment for that individual, knowing that I am housed and they are not?

What does it say about my responsibility to maybe not call the police on someone if it runs the risk of costing that someone, with darker skin, their life?

What does it say about my individual, personal responsibility to support systemic change through mass decarceration in a time of global pandemic, remembering those in prison as if I were in prison with them?

But.
There’s always a but.

We fall short. I fall short. The truth is, we don’t comply... and perhaps we can’t. Perhaps we have yet to learn how to love our neighbor as ourselves. Perhaps we are not yet old enough to master the art of love.

That is one of the great frustrations and beauties of the Christian life: it’s always stretching us, goading us onward, saying to us that there is always more work to be done. These commandments, like the horizon, are always beckoning us deeper into God’s heart and just as we feel to be drawing near we catch a glimpse of just how much further we have to go.

I think the secret, the mark of holiness, is to want to obey these commandments, no matter how poorly we live them out. The secret is in our heart’s desiring. Do we really desire to love with all our hearts and souls and minds and to love our neighbor as ourselves? And if so, what changes would that require of us?

The answer may lie the word hang: “On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.” This word is easy to overlook. It can mean a lot of different things, some innocent (like here) and some not so innocent. For example, this is the same word used in the Acts of the Apostles to describe the manner in which Jesus hung on the cross.

That shifts the whole meaning of the command to love God and one another, doesn’t it?

To love with all our hearts and souls and minds, is itself a sort of crucifixion. The first commandment is the vertical dimension (+) of our faith, between us and God. And the second is like it, the horizontal dimension (+) between us and the people God has made. It sets the pattern for a cruciform way of life. It means to die to ourselves. God asks no less.

As we prepare to renew our baptismal vows on the feast of All Saints, may we who have been united to Christ in his death through the waters of baptism ponder these things in our hearts:

Dare we desire to love more?
Dare we continue in this cruciform life?
Dare we pray, as in today’s collect, “make us love what you command?”

For he has but one, and that is love.

Amen.

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Videos (show all)

“I Moan Like a Lonely Bird on a Roof”
The Desire to Love
What Love is this?

Location

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6525 Inwood Rd
Dallas, TX
75209

General information

St. Thomas is located in Dallas, Texas, and is a parish of the Episcopal Diocese of Dallas. We currently have about 250 regular communicants. In 2000, we celebrated the 50th anniversary of the parish’s founding. We enjoy a diverse community of young and old, families and single people, and different ethnic backgrounds. We seek to build our common life in Christ through shared worship, service, learning and teaching, and social activities.

Opening Hours

Tuesday 10:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 16:00
Thursday 10:00 - 16:00
Friday 10:00 - 16:00
Sunday 10:00 - 11:15
Sunday 08:00 - 09:00
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