St. Luke "Community" U.M.C. - Dallas

Welcome to St. Luke "Community" United Methodist Church' official page in Dallas, TX, where we are "Reaching Up to God & Out into the Community."

We are a church committed to continuing our mission of reaching up to God and out into the community. We do this though our mission, vision, and core values. We Celebrate: • Our African Heritage and Culture Dynamic Transformational, Spirit- filled Praise and Worship. We Embrace: • Diversity and Inclusiveness. • The Caring and Nurturing of "The Village”. We Educate Through: • Reflective Study of the Scriptures. • Supporting Academic Excellence & Higher Education. We Dedicate Ourselves To: • Community Involvement. • The Struggle for Liberation & Social Justice. • A Lifestyle of Stewardship, Prayer, and Spiritual Discipline. • The Making of Disciples for Jesus Christ. • A Ministry of Excellence.

Mission: St. Luke is called to proclaim the gospel, transform lives and make disciples for Jesus Christ.

upperroom.org

Upper Room Disciplines for June 18th, 2020

Today's Devotion: Romans 6:1-11

The Upper Room Disciplines

Seeing and Seeking

We refer to the writings of Paul as epistles-a literary form that uses a letter format. Paul's epistles are meant as teaching tools to be read aloud in the early church. Paul's work masterfully draws on other Greek forms, like the diatribe-a rousing speech that carries a sting of rebuke.

In this epistle, Paul adds a form of writing reminiscent of a legal argument. He begins with an impossible, outrageous question: "Should we continue in sin in order that grace may abound?" Like a great attorney or a teacher in a classroom, Paul wants to raise eyebrows in order to set up his argument. Should we sin intentionally? Well, of course not! But isn't sin inevitable? Well, yes. So how do we resolve this tension?

Now that he has our attention, Paul carefully contrasts two competing forces: sin and grace. He reminds us that death claimed Christ, but resurrection released death's hold. In the same way, sin might have a hold on our humanity; in our baptism we have new life. Can death claim Christ again? Certainly not. Can it claim you again? That question may not be as easy to answer, but it certainly provokes a useful conversation about living the resurrected life. What does freedom from sin look like? How do we know it? Carry this question with you today. Look at the forces of death and life at work in our communities, our churches, even our own bodies. Where do we feel relaxed and confident? Where do we feel anxious? Where do we see God at work? Where is God calling us to be the body of Christ, bringing resurrection power to bear on difficult circumstances?

TODAY'S PRAYER
In you alone, Lord of life, do we live and move and find our being. Empower us to choose the freedom for which you made us so that we can bear witness to your incomparable grace. Amen.

By Melissa Tidwell

***

SCRIPTURE OVERVIEW
The story of Isaac and Ishmael resounds through human history down to today. According to Genesis, tensions between the descendants of Isaac and the descendants of Ishmael go back to the lifetime of Abraham himself. These are complex issues, and we are wise to understand them theologically, not just politically. The psalmist calls out to God from a place of desperation, yet even in desperation there is confident hope in God. Paul attacks a theology of "cheap grace" in Romans. Yes, God forgives us; but this does not give us license to do whatever we want. When we are joined to Christ, we die to ourselves. Jesus tells his disciples that following him is a sort of death. We sacrifice a life under our own control yet find something much greater.

upperroom.org We refer to the writings of Paul as epistles—a literary form that uses a letter format. Paul’s epistles are meant as teaching tools to be read aloud in the early church. Paul’s work masterfully draws on other Greek forms, like the diatribe—a rousing speech that carries a sting of rebuke........

Highland Park United Methodist Church

Our new yet St. Luke family member pastor, speaking candidly and in relationship with a beloved UM colleague regarding race and politics, and religion that’s kept them on the battlefield for our risen and revolutionary Jesus.

Senior pastors, Richie Butler and Paul Rasmussen have a long-running friendship. Hear their heartfelt concerns about racial injustice in the city of Dallas and learn more about the steps our churches will take to be the light of Christ in our community.

General Board of Church and Society

Tomorrow at 2pm EST, join us for a livestream of our webinar, "Imagining a Just Economy post COVID-19" with experts from the National Employment Law Project and Center for American Progress.

Register Here: http://ow.ly/QKge50A8ncP

upperroom.org

Upper Room Disciplines for June 17th, 2020

Today's Devotion: Psalm 86:1-10, 16-17

The Upper Room Disciplines

Seeing and Seeking

When I read psalms I often try to imagine who the narrator is and why he or she composed the psalm. Sometimes I imagine the psalmist as a liturgist, rousing a congregation to praise. Sometimes I imagine the psalmist as a person like me, alone and unable to sleep, conversing with God in the wee hours.

The composer of this psalm draws on lines from many other scriptures; it is less a striking original composition and more a holy mashup. That does not mean that this prayer has less worth; it holds powerful statements that experienced persons of prayer have handed down in their hours of need.

One person I can image praying this psalm is Ishmael, the child rescued by God in the wilderness. Can you imagine this as his lament? The themes of seeing and hearing are present, as is being the child of a servant. In the reference to many nations bowing down to Yahweh, I hear a longing for the healing of the breach between the sons of Abraham. That kind of mutual worship may seem only a dream today, which makes it our lament as well.

The narrator expresses sorrow as well as certainty that God listens to our prayers, including our middle-of-the-night sighs and groans. Lament, doubt, and questioning are healthy and perhaps even necessary elements to forging a lasting faith. But our certainty that our prayers matter to God allows us to lament without bitterness, to lament with humility and power. Our spiritual formation is a long and sometimes circuitous process that seeks to make us into children of God who can pray with power.

TODAY'S PRAYER
Hear our prayer, O Lord, and the prayers of your servants and their children. Heal every division within your house, that all your children will glorify you in spirit and truth. Amen.

By Melissa Tidwell

***

SCRIPTURE OVERVIEW
The story of Isaac and Ishmael resounds through human history down to today. According to Genesis, tensions between the descendants of Isaac and the descendants of Ishmael go back to the lifetime of Abraham himself. These are complex issues, and we are wise to understand them theologically, not just politically. The psalmist calls out to God from a place of desperation, yet even in desperation there is confident hope in God. Paul attacks a theology of "cheap grace" in Romans. Yes, God forgives us; but this does not give us license to do whatever we want. When we are joined to Christ, we die to ourselves. Jesus tells his disciples that following him is a sort of death. We sacrifice a life under our own control yet find something much greater.

upperroom.org When I read psalms I often try to imagine who the narrator is and why he or she composed the psalm. Sometimes I imagine the psalmist as a liturgist, rousing a congregation to praise. Sometimes I imagine the psalmist as a person like me, alone and unable to sleep, conversing......

nbcdfw.com

Brazen Theft Leaves Boy Scout Troop Without Camping, Fishing Equipment

https://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/brazen-theft-leaves-boy-scout-troop-without-camping-fishing-equipment/2389853/

nbcdfw.com A Dallas Boy Scouts of America troop has been hit with a costly crime. A crook snuck in and stole their trailer full of tents, cooking and fishing supplies, leaving summer camp canceled and winter camp plans in limbo.

upperroom.org

Upper Room Disciplines for June 15th, 2020

Today's Devotion: Genesis 21:8-21

The Upper Room Disciplines

Seeing and Seeking

The story of Hagar and Ishmael being sent into the wilderness has as its backstory a great moment in biblical history gone sour. Abraham and Sarah have received a powerful, joyful promise that they will have many descendants. But what do you do when a promise from God does not seem to be fulfilled?

For Abraham and Sarah, the answer was to take matters into their own hands. Sarah sends Abraham to her maid Hagar, who bears him a son, Ishmael. This may have seemed a good solution for a while, but when Sarah conceives and bears Isaac, the relationships grow strained. Sarah perceives a rivalry between the boys and demands the first son of Abraham, Hagar's son, be sent away. Abraham's response, to send the two into the desert with scant supplies, seems rushed and cruel. The story carries a certain parallel to the story of how Abraham almost sacrifices his other son, Isaac. These stories raise the question: How do we fix the messes we make? Is repentance only a feeling of being sorry for a mistake, or should it involve action, reparations, and amends?

The spiritual practice of the daily examen helps us ask questions about where we go wrong and how we can move ahead in the knowledge of God's mercy. A simple examen reviews each day and asks, "Where did I see God at work today?" and "Where did I turn from the way of grace today?" The point is not punishment for our flawed humanity but accountability for those places that need a prayer, an apology, a shift in perspective, or a renewed commitment. However you structure your practices, the examen is a tool that can help identify patterns and deepen faithful response.

TODAY'S PRAYER
Examine our hearts, God of mercy. Assure us of your promise of presence and compassion, which we can use to amend our ways and to mend broken hearts. Amen.

By Melissa Tidwell

***

SCRIPTURE OVERVIEW
The story of Isaac and Ishmael resounds through human history down to today. According to Genesis, tensions between the descendants of Isaac and the descendants of Ishmael go back to the lifetime of Abraham himself. These are complex issues, and we are wise to understand them theologically, not just politically. The psalmist calls out to God from a place of desperation, yet even in desperation there is confident hope in God. Paul attacks a theology of "cheap grace" in Romans. Yes, God forgives us; but this does not give us license to do whatever we want. When we are joined to Christ, we die to ourselves. Jesus tells his disciples that following him is a sort of death. We sacrifice a life under our own control yet find something much greater.

upperroom.org The story of Hagar and Ishmael being sent into the wilderness has as its backstory a great moment in biblical history gone sour. Abraham and Sarah have received a powerful, joyful promise that they will have many descendants. But what do you do when a promise from God does not......

vote.org

Everything You Need to Vote - Vote.org

Are you registered to vote? Tomorrow, June 15th is the last day to register to vote for the July 15th election. You must postmark your voter registration by June 15, 2020. Check for your name and address on the rolls. Then, get a ride to the polls.

https://www.vote.org/

vote.org Register to vote. Check your registration status. Get your absentee ballot. Fast, free, easy, secure, nonpartisan.

Do You See What I See?

General Board of Church and Society

John Wesley campaigned tirelessly for improved conditions for prisoners. He bemoaned the deplorable conditions under which most prisoners in his day lived.

Watch our recent webinar, "Confined and Vulnerable: Detained and Incarcerated during COVID-19."

http://ow.ly/JWO950A1j3A

dallasnews.com

At pivotal moment, Richie Butler takes the pulpit at black Dallas church once led by the iconic Zan Holmes

dallasnews.com A consequential bit of local church news is the balm all our souls could use right about now as we grapple with how to genuinely confront systemic racial...

upperroom.org

Upper Room Disciplines for June 12th, 2020

Today's Devotion: Romans 5:6-8

The Upper Room Disciplines

Encountering God

"Christ arrives right on time. . . . He doesn't wait for us to get ready" (the message).

The first movement of the gospel symphony is that God loves us; God makes the first move to invite us and welcome us home. Christ comes to make the invitation clear and personal.

Like the childhood game of hide-and-seek, God yells through Christ, "Ready or not, here I come."

I work for a group of Franciscan Sisters who love Saint Francis, Saint Clare, and Christmas. Most scholars think Saint Francis introduced the first living nativity in the thirteenth century. He chose a cave in Greccio, Italy, gathered a manger with straw and some animals, and told the people to come for a special midnight Mass. The night was lit like day; Francis stood before the people with deep piety and wondrous joy, and the townsfolk witnessed the humble beginnings of a God who bends low to be with them (and also with the shepherds in Bethlehem), people who are totally unprepared for God to appear and to walk with them. What kind of God would choose a manger and come as a baby? Saint Francis loved Christmas and the incredible surprise of the Incarnation, God with us. The Sisters I work with have that same joy of believing they are loved, seeing evidence of God among them, and welcoming everyone with warm hospitality.

The second movement to the symphony of God's love is our response. We receive God's love, and we share God's love. One of the conversions of Saint Francis occurred when he got off his horse to give a leper a coin and ended up embracing the leper. From that experience, Francis shared God's love with all, from Popes to Muslim sultans to the birds of the air. We are loved, and we share love.

TODAY'S PRAYER
Gracious God, thank you for loving me and showing the depth of your love in Christ's life, death, and resurrection. Amen.

By Larry Peacock

***

SCRIPTURE OVERVIEW
The readings this week lack a common theme. Genesis recounts the promise of Isaac's miraculous birth and the fulfillment of that promise-a key story in the history of God's people. The psalmist cries out with gladness to the Lord, for we are God's people and the grateful recipients of unending faithfulness. Paul rejoices because we have peace with God through our faith in Jesus Christ. This is not because of anything we have done or could do; rather, God's love sent Christ to die for us when we were distant from God. In Matthew, Jesus calls his disciples and declares that God's harvest is vast, but there are not enough workers willing to go into the fields. It is a call for us to go as the disciples did.

upperroom.org “Christ arrives right on time. . . . He doesn’t wait for us to get ready” (the message). The first movement of the gospel symphony is that God loves us; God makes the first move to invite us and welcome us home. Christ comes to make the invitation clear and personal. Like the childhood game o....

zwhjcoc.org

Registration Form - Juneteenth — Zan Holmes Community Outreach Center

zwhjcoc.org Juneteenth: Hustle & Flow, presented by the Zan Wesley Holmes Jr. Community Outreach Center, will include a series of coaching sessions for what is being termed the “Hustle & Flow Krewe.” Two sessions will be offered each day during the week via Zoom.

upperroom.org

Upper Room Disciplines for June 11th, 2020

Today's Devotion: Romans 5:1-5

The Upper Room Disciplines

Encountering God

God makes us right, gives us peace, brings us into grace, and offers us hope for the future. Despite our own best efforts and mighty struggles, God is always before us offering us a hand and inviting us to take the first step toward "the wide open spaces of God's grace and glory" (The Message).

A retreat I attended in college used an article from theologian Paul Tillich entitled, "Accept That You Are Accepted." It was a dense paper, but I still remember the title and the relief I felt that I did not have to earn, win, or beg for God's love.

After his theological welcoming statement to begin Chapter 5, Paul addresses the challenges that new Christians are facing. Paul names the suffering, our feeling "hemmed in with troubles" (the message). He does not deny present suffering but looks deeper and longer to see what may emerge as we face the challenges.

Can we get a new perspective on our challenges? Can we see God at work amid difficulties? Can we cultivate patience and deepen trust? Once when I was looking for new ministry, I felt God was opening doors as I had three wonderful possibilities to pursue with new applications. After all three doors closed, I began to question the confidence I had in God when the three had seemed so right and good. My spiritual director reminded me to have hope and take the long view. Sometime later, a new door opened that was an even better fit than the previous opportunities.

Behold, God is able to do a new thing, working through difficulties and troubles and strengthening our character and our hope so we are not disappointed and often are surprised.

TODAY'S PRAYER
Hold me, loving God, and steady me to keep walking with you on the paths you open. Give me patience and persistence in following your call. Amen.

By Larry Peacock

***

SCRIPTURE OVERVIEW
The readings this week lack a common theme. Genesis recounts the promise of Isaac's miraculous birth and the fulfillment of that promise-a key story in the history of God's people. The psalmist cries out with gladness to the Lord, for we are God's people and the grateful recipients of unending faithfulness. Paul rejoices because we have peace with God through our faith in Jesus Christ. This is not because of anything we have done or could do; rather, God's love sent Christ to die for us when we were distant from God. In Matthew, Jesus calls his disciples and declares that God's harvest is vast, but there are not enough workers willing to go into the fields. It is a call for us to go as the disciples did.

upperroom.org God makes us right, gives us peace, brings us into grace, and offers us hope for the future. Despite our own best efforts and mighty struggles, God is always before us offering us a hand and inviting us to take the first step toward “the wide open spaces of God’s......

St. Luke History: A Caring Community Church

The St. Paul Mission Church was the first name given to the church in 1933. It was organized through the vision and help of the historic St. Paul Methodist Church which still stands in the Arts District of downtown Dallas. Rev. Nathan Pinkard designated as the first pastor in 1933. It said that Rev.Pinkard walked the streets of Spring Ave, Wahoo, and Baldwin with a hymnbook and a Bible asking neighbors to visit and become a part of the ministry of the little church that met in a nearby community gathering place. Through prayer and persistence, the church started to grow by caring for others and showing Christian love. The annual conference assigned Rev. Dale Hansboro as the pastor in 1935. Rev.Hansboro continued the struggle to bring a Methodist church to East Dallas.

In 1937 the Rev. M.L. Reed was selected to serve as the pastor. His tenure was the longest of all the pastors during the first 20 years. During his administration, the Mission Church progressed from a small storefront church to a small building built by the congregation. In 1941, a fire destroyed the building but not the determination of this committed group of Christian. They met at the home of Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Mc Lewis until their church repaired. After several years of continued work a red brick structure at Wahoo and Spring Ave. was completed in1945. In the late 1950s, the name changed to St. Luke Methodist Church. While the congregation was still tiny in numbers, it was a solid Christian force in the community. Led by Rev.Glover Thomas, the vision was to build toward the future by assessing all possibilities for church growth in the community.

The 1960s proved to be an exciting period in the life of the striving congregation. Under the leadership of Rev.J.R. Caruthers, St. Luke continued to serve the community. In 1965, the Lord sent his servant Dr. T. B. Echols as the 14th pastor of St. Luke Church. Dr.Echols soon realized the great potential God had provided to St. Luke for growth. He noted that the lay persons were young, caring and involved. His ministry filled with dynamic community programs for children and youth utilizing lay members as Christian leaders.

On July 14, 1974, St.Luke held its first services at the R.L.Thornton Freeway location under the newly anointed leadership of newly appointed Pastor Zan Wesley Homles, Jr. He also added the word “Community” to our name to proclaim to the world that St. Luke Church would always work for our Lord Jesus Christ through community service. After 27 years of dedicated service to St. Luke church and the community, Pastor Holmes retired in 2002. Pastor Tyrone Gordon appointed as the senior pastor of St. Luke “Community” United Methodist Church in July 2002 and served until February 2012. St. Luke Church has completed a series of mission trips; Brazil in 2004, and to the continent of Africa to Zimbabwe and Zambia in 2005. St. Luke mission trips have included New Orleans, 2006; Africa 2007; Mississippi in 2008; Galveston 2009 and the Bahamas in 2010.

In 2007. St. Luke purchased the Youth and Children’s Center located just across the south parking lot to enhance the space available for activities for children and youth of the church. With the help of great Christian Church members and leaders, the mortgage on the main building was fully paid in February 2011.

St. Luke is the Mother Church to recently chartered The Village UMC, Desoto Texas, Rev. Derek Jacobs, lead pastor. The Rev.Dr. Henry L. Masters, Sr. was appointed pastor of St. Luke “Community” U.M.C. in July 2012 and retired June 2014. As Senior Pastor Dr. Henry Masters, Sr. revitalize the youth ministry and Disciple Bible study ministries. In July 2014, Dr. Michael Bowie, Jr. appointed as Senior Pastor of St.Luke.

St. Luke continues its mission to make disciples for Christ into the21st century. St. Luke continues to give thanks to God and to follow the great commission: “Go and make disciples of all nations baptizing them in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit.

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Videos (show all)

Followers of Christ! Celebrating 87 Years in Ministry!
Happy 87th Anniversary St. Luke!
Happy 87th birthday, St. Luke!
Dr. Bowie Christmas Invite!

Location

Telephone

Address


5710 E R L Thornton Fwy
Dallas, TX
75223

General information

"St. Luke" is a church with active and exciting ministries serving the community. Sunday Worship Celebrations: 8:00 am & 11:00 am Church School: 9:45 am Wednesday Night Live 6:00 pm 5710 East R.L. Thornton (I-30 & Winslow) * Our Mission * St. Luke is called to proclaim the gospel, transform lives and make disciples for Jesus Christ. * Our Vision * Through the Holy Spirit, God is calling us to ministries of excellence which embrace and nurture children, youth, adults, and families to reach their God-given potential; to be advocates and prophetic voices in the "community" for all oppressed peoples. **************************************************** PLEASE VISIT OUR "EVENTS" and other tabs for more information about what's going on at "The Luke!
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