Wesley United Methodist Church

Wesley United Methodist Church

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We'd love to see you at our Annual Celebration and Fundraiser on Dec. 8. Thank you for your continued leadership!
https://fb.me/e/4H8WGRat7
Troop 141 is still collecting aluminum cans and plastic caps/container lids lids (separately). You can always drop them off by the side door of the church garage. Thanks!
This came to me from Janet Fraembs.... P Scott Smith 12-22-1922 - 4-4-2020 (age 97). Our Dad, retired Physics Professor at Eastern Illinois University, passed away peacefully in his sleep early yesterday morning. Loved and adored by his family. Dad took a huge bite out of life, lived it to the absolute fullest. When I think of his passing I think of Gus (Robert Duval) on his deathbed on Lonesome Dove, “It’s been a hell of a party.”
Longtime members and friends will want to know of the passing of P. Scott Smith who was a force to be reckoned with back in the day. He had been living near his daughter Karen in Massachusetts(?). Not sure I got the state right. Scott. was a physics professor at EIU. At Wesley he served on various committees and taught the high school Sunday School class at one time.
Thank you for the beautiful and inspiring online services during these trying times!
Hello Friends! During this time of "online church", it seems there are plenty of sermons but maybe not so much music! I have recorded some old favorites that may speak to you at this Lenten (and COVID-19) season on YouTube.com/users/brendabuchanan1 Enjoy! (more to come)
Cindy Shepherd of Faith in Place created an event for our film screening on September 22:

https://www.facebook.com/events/2095958007374480/
Please can i get some Methodist hyms tonic solfa?

Am learning keyboard and i want to play for my church
Hey, All -
Just to let you know, I am still having computer issues so have trouble sending mass emails. You may not hear a lot from me for a bit until it's all squared away.
Thanks for your patience!
Want to see the world? Host an international student!
Thanks to the choir for the wonderfully powerful Hallelujah Chorus Easter morning.
Good Morning,

My dad is a Methodist Pastor in Humboldt, IL. He recently had Triple Bypass surgery in late June. In the gofundme link below there are extensive details on what happened. We are currently raising money to help pay his medical bills. If you are able to give, we greatly appreciate your help. If you are not in a position to donate, we would appreciate it if you would share our story by clicking the share button below.

Wesley United Methodist Church - where ALL are welcome - no exceptions. We are a United Methodist Church located in Charleston, Illinois. We are just a few blocks from the EIU campus.

All are welcome to join us in worship on Sundays at 9:30AM. We look forward to seeing you!

Operating as usual

07/30/2021

SOAKED was a big hit at Wesley this summer! The kids had a blast and DID GET SOAKED! Check out the comments for more videos! Post any pics you have below 👇

07/29/2021

The Produce Exchange is Back!

Do you have an abundance of produce
you’re looking to give away? Wesley is
bringing back the produce exchange!
Feel free to leave your produce in the
hallway by the fellowship hall. There will
be a basket provided for donations that
will be gifted to the Charleston Food
Pantry. Happy Harvesting!

The Produce Exchange is Back!

Do you have an abundance of produce
you’re looking to give away? Wesley is
bringing back the produce exchange!
Feel free to leave your produce in the
hallway by the fellowship hall. There will
be a basket provided for donations that
will be gifted to the Charleston Food
Pantry. Happy Harvesting!

07/29/2021

MASKING UPDATE
Due to the increasing spread of the Delta variant of COVID-19, both the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and the Illinois Department of Public Health have recommended that in areas of high or substantial risk all persons wear face masks while indoors regardless of their vaccination status. The Illinois Great Rivers Conference of The United Methodist Church urges adherence to CDC and IDPH guidelines. Therefore, face masks will be required of everyone while in the Wesley UMC building for any reason as long as Coles County is considered a high or substantial risk area as it is now. The Delta variant is proving to be much more easily transmitted and is an especially dangerous threat to unvaccinated people, including those with reduced immunity, medical conditions that make vaccination impossible, and children under the age of 12 who are not yet eligible for vaccination. While this feels like a step backwards, and many of us who are vaccinated feel safe without masks, we want to do everything we can to slow the spread of the virus and keep everyone safe. So far, our efforts at Wesley have been 100% successful, and we want to keep it that way. We will continue to issue updates as necessary via Wesley communications. Meanwhile, let's continue to care and pray for our neighbors, especially those who are most vulnerable, and for an end to the COVID-19 virus.

MASKING UPDATE
Due to the increasing spread of the Delta variant of COVID-19, both the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and the Illinois Department of Public Health have recommended that in areas of high or substantial risk all persons wear face masks while indoors regardless of their vaccination status. The Illinois Great Rivers Conference of The United Methodist Church urges adherence to CDC and IDPH guidelines. Therefore, face masks will be required of everyone while in the Wesley UMC building for any reason as long as Coles County is considered a high or substantial risk area as it is now. The Delta variant is proving to be much more easily transmitted and is an especially dangerous threat to unvaccinated people, including those with reduced immunity, medical conditions that make vaccination impossible, and children under the age of 12 who are not yet eligible for vaccination. While this feels like a step backwards, and many of us who are vaccinated feel safe without masks, we want to do everything we can to slow the spread of the virus and keep everyone safe. So far, our efforts at Wesley have been 100% successful, and we want to keep it that way. We will continue to issue updates as necessary via Wesley communications. Meanwhile, let's continue to care and pray for our neighbors, especially those who are most vulnerable, and for an end to the COVID-19 virus.

07/28/2021

WE'RE HIRING!
Wesley United Methodist Church is seeking a Nursery Coordinator. The Nursery Coordinator will provide an innovative and enriching child care program encompassing activities for infants through 5-year-old on Sunday mornings and infants through elementary aged children at other times. Pay is $11.00 per hour. Please send a resume to [email protected]

WE'RE HIRING!
Wesley United Methodist Church is seeking a Nursery Coordinator. The Nursery Coordinator will provide an innovative and enriching child care program encompassing activities for infants through 5-year-old on Sunday mornings and infants through elementary aged children at other times. Pay is $11.00 per hour. Please send a resume to [email protected]

07/28/2021

SPECIAL INVITATION
On Sunday, August 8, 8:30 a.m., the Living Word Class invites anyone interested to join them in watching a video review of "The Rewritten Life" by Rev. Jessica LaGrone. It tells the stories of 6 biblical individuals whose lives were changed when God/Jesus renamed them.

SPECIAL INVITATION
On Sunday, August 8, 8:30 a.m., the Living Word Class invites anyone interested to join them in watching a video review of "The Rewritten Life" by Rev. Jessica LaGrone. It tells the stories of 6 biblical individuals whose lives were changed when God/Jesus renamed them.

[07/26/21]   Power

Ephesians 3:14-21—John 6:1-21

9th Sunday After Pentecost—July 25, 2021

Wesley United Methodist Church—Charleston, Illinois

Rev. Tom Corum—Directing Pastor

Seven days ago, we heard Paul, or someone writing in Paul’s name, announce to the early churches and to us that we are citizens with the saints, members of the household of God, built upon the foundation of the apostles and prophets, a holy temple in the Lord, and a dwelling place for God.

To which a person might be inclined to answer, “Paul, could you please cite your sources?” In other words, find me a church that actually looks like that. Hand me some hard evidence. I, for one, have been hanging out in churches for nearly all of fifty-six years, and I can’t say I’ve ever run across one that fit Paul’s lofty description.

In fact, most churches could better be described as citizens of the empire, members of competing ideological groups, built upon the foundation of the loudest voices, a fractured temple, impatient, gossipy, lacking in spiritual disciplines, flimsy in faith, and half-hearted in commitment. It’s just they’re all smart enough not to post that on their websites.

The disciples bear more of a resemblance to the church today, overwhelmed by a severe food shortage in the face of five thousand hungry men (plus however many women and children who, for some odd reason, hadn’t yet become worth counting).

Philip seems the most logical person to ask about a grocery store, since he is a local. Nobody knows the territory like a local.

And we who live on the other end of two thousand years and a resurrection, who mosey into church or tune in on Sunday with our spiffiest look and our most hopeful view of ourselves, might well shake a finger at Philip for his terribly limited and faithless thinking. Philip, don’t you know what Jesus can do?

But what is, is. You know that, and so do I. Circumstances can be pretty bleak. There’s only so much money, only so many qualified people, only so much time, only a limited reservoir of resources. And “only so much” can mean nearly nothing.

So, why on earth does Andrew even bother to call attention to a boy with five loaves of bread and a couple of fish? Talk about “only so much.”

But Jesus tells the crowd to be seated. “Blessed art thou, O Lord our God, king of the universe,” he prays in words typical of a Jewish mealtime prayer, “who brings forth bread from the earth.” There’s something about Jesus taking that “only so much” and giving thanks for it,

something about giving thanks for what is rather than bemoaning what is wrong or “not enough” about it.

So, what happened? What’s the miracle? Some will tell you the boy shared his loaves and fish and when the others saw it, they shared what they had as well, so there was enough after all. And as hard as it can be to get folks to share, I mean really share, that would be a miracle.

Was one boy’s naïve faith and generosity enough to light a spark? In a world full of jaded and pessimistic adults, a little faith and generosity would be a miracle.

Or did Jesus simply take that “not enough” food and turn it into more? Well, that would be a miracle too, wouldn’t it?

Here’s something I think I know. I don’t think it does us much good while walking around inside this story to spend too much time shining a spotlight on the limited, human response that six months’ wages won’t buy enough food for everyone to have even a little. Or what are five loaves of bread and two fish vis-à-vis such a tremendous crowd.

And knowing you and knowing me, wagging our finger at such pessimism or lack of faith (or what some folks might rightly call realism) only leaves us staring in a mirror.

No, there’s something here about who Jesus is and what happens when he comes on the scene. There’s something about a power available to us when we look to him in trust and obedience.

This week I ran across some words from Sister Ruth Burrows that left me both nervous and hopeful. She wrote: “Be happy to feel that you cannot control your life, that there is so much in you that you seem unable to cope with. Trust yourself to him, take each moment as it comes, for each moment holds him. Let him have the say, let him take charge, even though you are left feeling no one is in charge.” (Living Love and Our Father, 1990, Darton, Longman & Todd, p. 130)

It’s funny how Jesus starts with something, not nothing, though seemingly he could have started with nothing and brought the same result. He starts with something that clearly is not enough. In this case, not enough food. But it could just as well be not enough goodness, or not enough knowledge, or not enough wisdom, or not enough people, or not enough vision, or not enough planning, or not enough money, or not enough energy, or not enough time, or not enough strength, or not enough of whatever you find to be seriously lacking.

It could be not enough people care, or not enough people understand, or not enough people are willing, or not enough people view the situation the same way.

But when Jesus can get his hands on it, which sometimes means when you and I are willing to loosen our grip on it, he takes it, gives thanks for it, passes it around, and suddenly everybody is full. There are even leftovers.

So, Paul is praying for the churches today, which seems like pretty good news. He’s praying for us good, upright, hardworking, American Christians who push ourselves and each other to be more moral, helpful, socially conscious, and productive than we secretly know we ever will be.

Paul is putting in a good word on behalf of churches that are so set on people being good enough, correct enough, properly believing enough, socially active enough, involved enough, righteous enough, successful enough, and whatever else purportedly is needed to pass muster with God or whoever it is that’s keeping track, that all they feel is failure and frustration.

Paul, according to the Greek, is flat on his face praying. Let’s listen in again to what he’s saying:

I pray that according to the riches of (God’s) glory, he may grant that you may be

strengthened in your inner being with power through his Spirit, and that Christ

may dwell in your hearts through faith, as you are being rooted and grounded in

love. I pray that you may have the power to comprehend, with all the saints,

what is the breadth and length and height and depth, and to know the love of

Christ that surpasses knowledge, so that you may be filled with all the fullness of

God.

So, now when Paul has the audacity to suggest that we of too little spiritual means are citizens with the saints, members of the household of God, built upon the foundation of the apostles and prophets, a holy temple in the Lord, and a dwelling place for God—when Paul is daring enough to say all of that, and you and I cry, “God, help us!”—Paul responds with a faithful, “OK, then, let us pray.”

It's a pastor’s prayer for the church. And maybe for pastors, too. A prayer for power. A reminder that all of this is because of what God has done for us that we couldn’t do for ourselves. It’s not a liberal prayer about liberal issues, and it’s not a conservative prayer about conservative issues. It’s a prayer about the power to know the love of Christ and the filling of our hearts, minds, and wills with the fullness of God.

The best I can tell, and from my own experience, this isn’t a prayer for some sort of spiritual high or a flash of glory or even a single, identifiable moment when you open the door and let Jesus in. The indwelling of Christ is about the long haul. It’s about staying in the game and not giving up. It’s about waiting, and letting go, and waiting, and letting go, and waiting, and letting go, even when it seems like nobody is in charge.

I’ve felt the power at work in a couple of ways over the last few weeks. Today is the twenty-fourth day since my mom passed away. I honestly don’t know how a person is supposed to have a mother who is worth anything at all for fifty-six years and then proceed as a fully functioning human being without her in this world for the rest of their life.

Forget that I’m a fully formed, card-carrying adult and parent of my own right. Forget that I haven’t needed a mommy to survive since I don’t know when.

It’s just that getting by without the person you called Mom seems like living the rest of your life on five loaves of bread and a couple of fish. It’s just not enough.

But somehow, there’s the power. I don’t know it because somebody told me so. I know it because I feel it. I know it because I’m still here, still on my feet, still believing that somehow the five loaves and two fish will be enough—not because of me, but because of a power beyond me.

I’ve known it one card at a time, one hug at a time, one kind word at a time, one phone call at a time, one tear at a time, one conversation at a time, one sad moment at a time, one prayer I couldn’t figure out how to pray at a time, one attempt to keep on being faithful at a time, and one day at a time.

And I felt the power this week at Vacation Bible School. A friend of mine who saw the photos on Facebook said, “Your VBS looks like an absolutely enormous undertaking.” Well, it is.

But I felt the power. I felt it when I caught sight of all the volunteers, the old faithful ones and the brand-new ones, all the gifts and talents and love being offered, the enthusiasm and energy from start to finish, the excited kids, the money raised for Adler, the music, the beautiful and meaningful props and decorations, and most of all the joyous feeling of being church together.

Let’s be honest. Sometimes a lot about church seems like not enough, only so much. And we dwell on that. And we get discouraged. And we feel down. And we want to give up.

Or we go through the motions, but we forget the power. The whole world is hungry and there’s not enough bread. We’re out on the sea and we’re oh-so-near to the shore and the wind is blowing, and even a friendly face like Jesus looks like a threat.

But Jesus says, It’s me. Don’t be afraid.

He comes and dwells in our midst and says, Bring me your “not enough.”

And there is power.

Do you believe in the power?

What is the situation you’re trying to address through human power alone?

Do you believe that’s all there is?

Jesus brings power today that exceeds what we believe is at our disposal. Paul prays that the faithful ones will know that power.

It seems like you and I should pray for it, too.

Our Story

We are a United Methodist Church located in Charleston, Illinois on the south side of the Eastern Illinois University campus. Please join us for worship on Sundays at 8:30am and 10:45am. Sunday School for all ages takes place at 9:45am. No dress code - come as you are. ALL are welcome - no exceptions!

Follow us on Twitter! @CharlestonWUMC

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Location

Telephone

Address


2206 4th St
Charleston, IL
61920

Opening Hours

Monday 9am - 12pm
1pm - 4pm
Tuesday 9am - 12pm
1pm - 4pm
Wednesday 9am - 12pm
1pm - 4pm
Thursday 9am - 12pm
1pm - 4pm
Friday 9am - 12pm
1pm - 4pm
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