St. Aidan's Episcopal Church, Alexandria, VA

St. Aidan's Episcopal Church, Alexandria, VA

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Beautiful fresh trees at St Aidan's. No sorting through required. They were all gorgeous!
Wonderful message from Bishop Susan - very consoling and encouraging.
Did anyone else just hear former St. Aidan's seminarian Lauren Stanley on NPR (All Things Considered)? If I understood correctly, she's serving as a mission priest on a reservation in South Dakota. They interviewed her because she's driving people to the polls--which comes as no surprise.

And this on the same day Bishop Michael Curry was interviewed by Joshua Johnson on the 1A!
Starting at 3pm this Saturday, 10/6, you will be able to smell sizzling bratwurst, watch excited kids at Kinderfest games, hear the German band's oompah, sample delicious Virginia beers and bake sale treats, and browse tempting silent auction donations. Please join us for St. Aidan's biggest party of the year, Oktoberfest! The fest runs from 3-7pm, with Kinderfest 3-5pm (games, cake walk, face painting, and more.) For more info call (703) 360-4220 or visit http://www.staidansepiscopal.com. Rain or shine.
St. Aidan’s Ministry Fair is happening now!
Getting ready for Oktoberfest. This Saturday from 3-7pm. German food, music, silent auction, bake sale, and lots of fun things for kids!!

Welcome to St. Aidan's Episcopal Church, a warm and welcoming place no matter where you are on your faith journey.

08/03/2021

Sacred Ground Series Beginning in September

We invite you to join in Sacred Ground, a curriculum that calls us to read, watch and learn about the history of race and racism in America. In six sessions two weeks apart this fall, we will explore together an online curriculum that focuses on Indigenous, Black, Latino and Asian/Pacific Americans as their histories intersect with European American history, and the impact of it all on our world today.

At home, we will watch documentaries and read articles to help inform us. We will then gather in person for conversations that help us peel away the layers that have contributed to the challenges and divides of the present day—all while grounded in our call to faith, hope and love.

The Episcopal Church and Katrina Browne (the director of the documentary Traces of the Trade ) have developed this amazing series, which has been especially designed to help white people talk with other white people about the history of race in America. The series is part of The Episcopal Church’s Becoming Beloved Community which is its long-term commitment to racial healing, reconciliation and justice.

BEGINNING SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 12
At St. Aidan’s Sanctuary
1 p.m. – 3 p.m.
Sept. 12, 26
October 10, 24
November 7, 21

Please use this link to register: https://www.signupgenius.com/go/10c0e48adae28a7ff2-sacred

Sponsored by the Social Justice Committee and the Center for Spiritual Deepening

Sacred Ground Series Beginning in September

We invite you to join in Sacred Ground, a curriculum that calls us to read, watch and learn about the history of race and racism in America. In six sessions two weeks apart this fall, we will explore together an online curriculum that focuses on Indigenous, Black, Latino and Asian/Pacific Americans as their histories intersect with European American history, and the impact of it all on our world today.

At home, we will watch documentaries and read articles to help inform us. We will then gather in person for conversations that help us peel away the layers that have contributed to the challenges and divides of the present day—all while grounded in our call to faith, hope and love.

The Episcopal Church and Katrina Browne (the director of the documentary Traces of the Trade ) have developed this amazing series, which has been especially designed to help white people talk with other white people about the history of race in America. The series is part of The Episcopal Church’s Becoming Beloved Community which is its long-term commitment to racial healing, reconciliation and justice.

BEGINNING SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 12
At St. Aidan’s Sanctuary
1 p.m. – 3 p.m.
Sept. 12, 26
October 10, 24
November 7, 21

Please use this link to register: https://www.signupgenius.com/go/10c0e48adae28a7ff2-sacred

Sponsored by the Social Justice Committee and the Center for Spiritual Deepening

Photos from St. Aidan's Episcopal Church, Alexandria, VA's post 07/29/2021

“When we walk on the earth with reverence, beauty will decide to trust us. Beauty is mysterious, a slow presence who waits for the ready, expectant heart” -- John O'Donohue

Photos from St. Aidan's Community Garden

07/27/2021

Sacred Ground Series Beginning in September

We invite you to join in Sacred Ground, a curriculum that calls us to read, watch and learn about the history of race and racism in America. In six sessions two weeks apart this fall, we will explore together an online curriculum that focuses on Indigenous, Black, Latino and Asian/Pacific Americans as their histories intersect with European American history, and the impact of it all on our world today.

At home, we will watch documentaries and read articles to help inform us. We will then gather in person for conversations that help us peel away the layers that have contributed to the challenges and divides of the present day—all while grounded in our call to faith, hope and love.

The Episcopal Church and Katrina Browne (the director of the documentary Traces of the Trade ) have developed this amazing series, which has been especially designed to help white people talk with other white people about the history of race in America. The series is part of The Episcopal Church’s Becoming Beloved Community which is its long-term commitment to racial healing, reconciliation and justice.

BEGINNING SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 12
At St. Aidan’s Sanctuary
1 p.m. – 3 p.m.
Sept. 12, 26
October 10, 24
November 7, 21

Please use this link to register: https://www.signupgenius.com/go/10c0e48adae28a7ff2-sacred

Sponsored by the Social Justice Committee and the Center for Spiritual Deepening

Sacred Ground Series Beginning in September

We invite you to join in Sacred Ground, a curriculum that calls us to read, watch and learn about the history of race and racism in America. In six sessions two weeks apart this fall, we will explore together an online curriculum that focuses on Indigenous, Black, Latino and Asian/Pacific Americans as their histories intersect with European American history, and the impact of it all on our world today.

At home, we will watch documentaries and read articles to help inform us. We will then gather in person for conversations that help us peel away the layers that have contributed to the challenges and divides of the present day—all while grounded in our call to faith, hope and love.

The Episcopal Church and Katrina Browne (the director of the documentary Traces of the Trade ) have developed this amazing series, which has been especially designed to help white people talk with other white people about the history of race in America. The series is part of The Episcopal Church’s Becoming Beloved Community which is its long-term commitment to racial healing, reconciliation and justice.

BEGINNING SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 12
At St. Aidan’s Sanctuary
1 p.m. – 3 p.m.
Sept. 12, 26
October 10, 24
November 7, 21

Please use this link to register: https://www.signupgenius.com/go/10c0e48adae28a7ff2-sacred

Sponsored by the Social Justice Committee and the Center for Spiritual Deepening

Photos from St. Aidan's Episcopal Church, Alexandria, VA's post 07/26/2021

“Maybe the desire to make something beautiful is the piece of God that is inside each of us.” — Mary Oliver, Devotions

Photos from St. Aidan's Community Garden

07/25/2021

Sacred Ground Series Beginning in September

We invite you to join in Sacred Ground, a curriculum that calls us to read, watch and learn about the history of race and racism in America. In six sessions two weeks apart this fall, we will explore together an online curriculum that focuses on Indigenous, Black, Latino and Asian/Pacific Americans as their histories intersect with European American history, and the impact of it all on our world today.

At home, we will watch documentaries and read articles to help inform us. We will then gather in person for conversations that help us peel away the layers that have contributed to the challenges and divides of the present day—all while grounded in our call to faith, hope and love.

The Episcopal Church and Katrina Browne (the director of the documentary Traces of the Trade ) have developed this amazing series, which has been especially designed to help white people talk with other white people about the history of race in America. The series is part of The Episcopal Church’s Becoming Beloved Community which is its long-term commitment to racial healing, reconciliation and justice.

BEGINNING SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 12
At St. Aidan’s Sanctuary
1 p.m. – 3 p.m.
Sept. 12, 26
October 10, 24
November 7, 21

Use this link to register:
https://www.signupgenius.com/go/10c0e48adae28a7ff2-sacred

Sponsored by the Social Justice Committee and the Center for Spiritual Deepening

Sacred Ground Series Beginning in September

We invite you to join in Sacred Ground, a curriculum that calls us to read, watch and learn about the history of race and racism in America. In six sessions two weeks apart this fall, we will explore together an online curriculum that focuses on Indigenous, Black, Latino and Asian/Pacific Americans as their histories intersect with European American history, and the impact of it all on our world today.

At home, we will watch documentaries and read articles to help inform us. We will then gather in person for conversations that help us peel away the layers that have contributed to the challenges and divides of the present day—all while grounded in our call to faith, hope and love.

The Episcopal Church and Katrina Browne (the director of the documentary Traces of the Trade ) have developed this amazing series, which has been especially designed to help white people talk with other white people about the history of race in America. The series is part of The Episcopal Church’s Becoming Beloved Community which is its long-term commitment to racial healing, reconciliation and justice.

BEGINNING SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 12
At St. Aidan’s Sanctuary
1 p.m. – 3 p.m.
Sept. 12, 26
October 10, 24
November 7, 21

Use this link to register:
https://www.signupgenius.com/go/10c0e48adae28a7ff2-sacred

Sponsored by the Social Justice Committee and the Center for Spiritual Deepening

Photos from St. Aidan's Episcopal Church, Alexandria, VA's post 07/23/2021

Capital Campaign Update

Under the extraordinary leadership of Jonathan Phinney and Mike Brynczak, the ceiling in White Hall is being repaired and the entire room is getting a much-needed coat of fresh paint. Hearty thanks to members of our parish who generously donated their time toward this effort: Mike, Jonathan, Matt, Kathy, Carl, Ted B, Mary Jane, Deb, and Elizabeth.

One of the goals of the Capital Campaign was to strengthen our sense of community by parishioners coming together to work on projects in and around our buildings and grounds. The fellowship and camaraderie was evident as people engaged in conversation, learned more about each other and strengthened their connection to each other and to St. Aidan’s in the process.

Photos from St. Aidan's Episcopal Church, Alexandria, VA's post 07/19/2021

Celtic Cross update

Our new Celtic cross is complete and standing beautifully on our grounds. Thank you again to our generous Capital Campaign donors. In addition, we are immensely grateful to Bernardo Aiquipa for his time, his amazing craftsmanship, and the care he took constructing our new cross.

[07/16/21]   Come out and celebrate summer with warm weather games and activities! All events are planned to take place outdoors. In the case of inclement weather, they will be moved indoors and notification of a change will be via Facebook and email.

Tonight Friday, July 16 - EYC meets (Gr. 6-12): 7-8:30pm…..be sure to bring a towel !

Family Game Days (PreK-5th Gr., parents encouraged to attend): THIS Sunday, July 18, 12-1pm.

Photos from St. Aidan's Episcopal Church, Alexandria, VA's post 07/11/2021

Celtic Cross Update

It is almost complete! Many thanks to our Capital Campaign contributors for making this possible.

To make our new cross a focal point of our property, we would like to surround it with personalized bricks. Be on the lookout for post cards in the coming weeks, with details for how you can sponsor a brick named for your family or a loved one.

07/09/2021

Celtic Cross Update

We are excited that the new St. Aidan’s cross is quickly becoming a reality! Here is a picture of the latest progress.

To make our new cross a focal point of our property, we would like to surround it with personalized bricks, similar to the bricks located around the fire pit area. Our new cross will be surrounded by the names of our congregation through bricks given in love. If you would like to sponsor a brick for your family or a loved one, a post card with details will be coming in the mail within the next couple of weeks.

Celtic Cross Update

We are excited that the new St. Aidan’s cross is quickly becoming a reality! Here is a picture of the latest progress.

To make our new cross a focal point of our property, we would like to surround it with personalized bricks, similar to the bricks located around the fire pit area. Our new cross will be surrounded by the names of our congregation through bricks given in love. If you would like to sponsor a brick for your family or a loved one, a post card with details will be coming in the mail within the next couple of weeks.

Photos from St. Aidan's Episcopal Church, Alexandria, VA's post 06/26/2021

St. Aidan’s Celtic Cross

We are so happy to share words and photos from Bernardo (the contractor who is building our replacement cross) on what he discovered when taking down the cross.

“I pushed the cross lightly and the whole cross came down immediately. It was hanging by a miracle. There must be a beehive … they were all over me.”

“So much life going on the cross even a small snake with eggs.”

~Bernardo Aiquipa

Photos from St. Aidan's Episcopal Church, Alexandria, VA's post 06/25/2021

St. Aidan's Celtic Cross

Current State of the Cross and Plans Going Forward
As anyone who has stood near the cross recently can attest, our Celtic cross is not in great shape. The wood has begun to rot, the beams are pulling away from each other, and the cross has begun to list towards Riverside Road.

A small group of dedicated parishioners have met over the past two years searching for an affordable solution that 1) honors the history of our Celtic cross and 2) replaces it with a new cross that can be enjoyed into the future. That solution has been found and work will soon begin on replacing the Celtic cross using the same design. It will still be a wooden cross and will replicate the existing cross.

History of St. Aidan’s Celtic Cross
For those unfamiliar with the history of how the Celtic cross came to be such a focal point on our church grounds and a part of the identity of St. Aidan’s, here is a quick overview:
• When the lightning hit the original church building in 1971, it hit the cross on the steeple. During the rebuilding of the church, the decision was made to place a cross in the churchyard, rather than on top of the church.

• The St. Aidan's Book of Remembrance includes a line for a Standing Cross on Church Lawn given in 1973.

• The cross was given by Paul Walters and his wife in memory of their son, Captain Robert James Walters, who was killed in Vietnam.

• The entry also includes the following: “with loving care by many members of the whole congregation in the carving, carpentry, and assembly of the finished cross."

• The cross was restored in the 1980s – a Day School dad spent weeks working on the restoration/carvings.

Because the cross is such a strong visual part of our grounds and our community, we wanted to be respectful and reverent as it was taken down this morning. Rev. Rosemary said a short blessing and parishioners were in attendance. Then the contractor -- Bernarndo Aiquipa -- got to work taking the cross down.

[06/04/21]   Don’t forget…..tonight starting at 7pm the EYC will gather for a year end bonfire. Hotdogs & s’mores included!!

[05/27/21]   *Date Change
Youth Group Year End Bon Fire Update……our meet date has changed to Friday, June 4th.

Photos from St. Aidan's Episcopal Church, Alexandria, VA's post 05/13/2021

🎉CONGRATULATIONS! 🎉 to Rebecca Troutman who received her Post Graduate Diploma in Anglican Studies from the Virginia Theological Seminary this morning!! Way to go, Rebecca!

05/01/2021

Come find adventure this summer at Shrine Mont Camps! We have fun, explore nature, and build community through adventure all summer long. Your camper will cook over a fire, make new friends, jump in the springs, and so much more! Don't miss out on the fun-register your 8-17 year old camper today! Visit www.shrinemontcamps.net

04/30/2021

Happy Friday, St. Aidan’s families! Check this out 😀

The diocesan Parish Youth Ministries is hosting this online gathering for 4-8th graders. Please share it with families in your congregation.

04/20/2021

Bishop Brooke-Davidson's Meditation for the Third Week of Eastertide - Truth: The Beginning of Healing

Alleluia; he is risen! Or as Bishop Barbara Harris put it, hallelujah anyhow. I write this meditation as our country awaits the verdict in the Chauvin trial, as Minneapolis erupts over another killing of a young Black man by a police officer, as reports of mass shootings roll in one after the other from Indianapolis, Kenosha, Austin. I write with some trepidation, knowing that this news will likely have been overtaken by more upheaval before it is published.

There is much to say, theologically speaking, about all these events, but the first two have been churning in my heart and soul for several days, and they’re more than enough for one meditation.

Hear what the Lord sayeth:
• A new command I give you: love one another, as I have loved you.
• Whatever you do to these my siblings, you do to me.
• You will be my witnesses, in Jerusalem and Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.

There’s plenty more where those come from. This is the foundation of all the rest, and of all that I have to say today.

Because I want to address two questions that often come up, or get swept under the rug, and my response is theological. These are the questions: Can we ever talk about anything but race? And, When can we stop talking about race all the time? A variant of this is bringing up anti-racism work with groups of church leaders and then listening to them talk about anything but that subject for an entire meeting.

Here are the answers: Yes, we can talk about things in addition to race, but not always instead of it. And we cannot stop talking about race; not in our lifetime, not in the future of the United States, probably not ever, until the whole catastrophic creation and infliction of racism is a very dim memory, which will not be for centuries.

This is why: we have not as a society faced and acknowledged the whole truth about the depth, the pervasiveness, and the ravages of racism. We don’t even know our own history; white people at least almost never really know it. We have very little understanding of how we got into the pervasive racist cultural “norms” that the killings of George Floyd and Daunte Wright focus our attention on. How can I say that so categorically? Well, I can only speak for myself, of course, and not for you. I have a fancy degree in history from a college that’s expected to know what it’s talking about. And I have learned more about the actual history of our country in the last year than I can even get my head around. More frustrating and more indicting, I have learned more about the impact of that hidden history on living people, and about the enmeshment and intractability of the sins of the past and their expression in the present. And that is a big problem, because there are so many sins, and they affect us all.

Some folks will say, “leave the past in the past. It’s time to move on. I have moved on, so should you.” The fact of the matter is that when we don’t confront the full story of the past, we cannot move past it, and we can’t see the present clearly. Until we know the whole truth, we don’t know the truth at all. And when we don’t know our history, we are doomed – damned – to keep repeating it.

Until we all know the whole truth, we are trapped in a dangerous, destructive, diabolical reality that does exactly that we have all renounced. Do you remember? And do you remember promising to do something about it?

• We have renounced evil and its deadly impact: Do you renounce Satan and all the spiritual forces of wickedness that rebel against God? Do you renounce the evil powers of the world which corrupt and destroy the creatures of God?

• We have promised that we would repent, make amends, act like Jesus: Will you seek and serve Christ in all persons, loving your neighbor as yourself? Will you strive for justice and peace among all people, and respect the dignity of every human being?

Keeping those vows in these times begins with the willingness of those who are “uncomfortable” with having to focus on issues of racism to accept the discomfort of learning the whole truth (because you’re only uncomfortable when you see it as somebody else’s issue, and that tells you a whole lot). Again, this is a theological issue.

So sayeth the Lord:
Jesus told the people who had faith in him, “If you keep on obeying what I have said, you truly are my disciples. You will know the truth, and the truth will set you free.” John 8:31-32

Only the truth will set us free from this madness and death.
Let me say it again: Only the whole truth will set you free. Not “them,” but you. ALL of us. People of color are exponentially disproportionately hurt by racism, but one important truth is that all of us suffer when some of us suffer. (There is one Body and one Spirit…) Those who are intentionally oppressed by racism lose, among many other things, the opportunity to fully express their gifts, and the whole culture is deprived. That’s just the tip of the iceberg. And those whose lives have been advantaged by a system that holds other people down are crippled, on some level, in heart and soul, even though they may not know it.

Here’s what I want you to know, if you wish we could stop talking about this. The way through it is to go through it. There’s no way around it, and ignoring it won’t make it go away. But the journey will not kill you, or actually even hurt you. It certainly won’t bore you. It is likely to bring pain – not the kind that’s fatal, but the kind that saves your life, like necessary medical procedures. You will survive. Your deep sense of self, rooted in the bedrock of eternal life as a beloved child of God, will survive. You do not have to accept blame, but we must all accept responsibility for our society. No, even that isn’t quite right: we must all keep the promises we made to God at our baptism. There’s nothing in there about the cozy comfort of denial and separation for some people. It’s all about reconciliation: seeking, serving, loving, striving, respecting. We have already declared the decision to live that way. And in our time, AT LAST, we are face to face as a whole society with the spiritual forces of wickedness that treat some categories of humans as inferior to others. It comes to us in our time to renounce the evil powers that corrupt and destroy our relationships, our lives, our futures. If you don’t see it as the foundational interstitial problem that infects all the other problems – study it some more.

There’s much, much more to do, beyond the listening and learning phase. But it can’t be skipped over. When your bishops and priests say that racism is sin, they mean that it’s something that we MUST address for the health of our souls, individually and collectively. We may not have invented it in our generation, but we did inherit it, and it is ours to confront and eradicate.

If you don’t know where to start (or you’re scared), sign up for a Sacred Ground group. You will learn in a format that conveys much information without shame or blame – but with great power. If you want to venture out on your own, read "Waking Up White," or "Stamped from the Beginning," or another of the dozens of excellent introductions to the topic. Any of these things will make you hungry for more.

And we’ll have help. Thus sayeth the Lord:
"If you love me, you will keep my commandments. And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another Advocate, to be with you forever. This is the Spirit of truth, whom the world cannot receive, because it neither sees him nor knows him. You know him, because he abides with you, and he will be in you." John 14:15-17

When can we stop talking about racism? When nobody wants to stop talking about it, because the healing is so much better than the pain.

Blessings,

Bishop Jennifer Brooke-Davidson

Videos (show all)

Mardi Gras party is in full swing!!
Ministry Fair is happening!  Come join us!
Irish dancing live at the Celtic Spring Fling!
Lots of joy and movement for our final hymn this morning!
A taste of today's inspiring spoken word poetry performance and workshop at St. Aidan's in conjunction with Project Voic...
Drumming at 8:30 service yesterday.
EYOA Drumming at the 10:30 service last week - they will return to perform at the 8:30 service tomorrow.  Thanks to Bria...
EYOA practicing - come see them play at the 10:30 service this week.
The Alfred Street Baptist Church praise team singing at St. Aidan's.

Location

Telephone

Address


8531 Riverside Rd
Alexandria, VA
22308

General information

Sunday services are at 8:30 a.m. (very family friendly service with guitar music and rhythm instruments for the kids), 10:30 a.m. (more traditional, but still family friendly, service with organ and choir), and 5:30 p.m. (Celtic service with lots of candlelight and time for silent meditation). All are welcome at any time!
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