Monastery of Christ in the Desert

Monastery of Christ in the Desert

Comments

I haqve not received post card for this month or last month please help me johnwhitney 4199805146 john whitney [email protected] .co
How come there are no pictures on your site of the statue
Where at the monastery can I find the statue on the hill of St Benedict and how can I get to where I can see it
Congratulations Abbot Christian on being elected the new Shepard of Christ in the Desert. I have been following you and retired Abbot Philip for some years. Sending prayers for you both.
So blessed to return to the monastery next month for a week of prayer - no news, no internet, no noise.
Just got back from 4 awesome days and nights at Christ in the Desert! Love Christ Desert.
I will like to join your Easter Service, what are your services hours?

Catholic Benedicitne Monks

Contemplative life of prayer and work for the glory of God and love of neighbor. We, the monks of Christ in the Desert Abbey, are an autonomous community of Catholic Benedictine men, seeking God through a common life of prayer, holy reading, study, and work, giving witness to Christ and the Gospel, in service to the church and the world. We are called together by Christ to support each other, living under the Rule of Saint Benedict and our abbot.

Mission: Serve God and Church by our witnessing to the gospel message in community that prays and works together in charity and service to one another.

Benedictine Abbey of Christ in the Desert

Baptism of the Lord, January 10, 2016

Baptism of the Lord, January 10, 2016
Scripture Readings: Isaiah 42:1-4, 6-7; Acts of the Apostles 10:34-38; Mark 1:7-11At

With the liturgical celebration of the Baptism of the Lord the beautiful Christmas season draws to a close. Yes, monks keep the Manger Scene in church and Christmas decorations up until now, still singing Christmas carols and keeping a
(Please click below to read the complete news item.)
https://christdesert.org/2016/01/baptism-of-the-lord-january-10-2016/

Benedictine Abbey of Christ in the Desert Scripture Readings: Isaiah 42:1-4, 6-7; Acts of the Apostles 10:34-38; Mark 1:7-11At

With the liturgical celebration of the Baptism of the Lord the beautiful Christmas season draws to a close. Yes, monks keep the Manger Scene in church and Christmas decorations up until now, still singing Christmas carols and keeping a festive mood, long after the secular society has ceased, probably as early as December 26th. A pity, when there is still so much to celebrate between Christmas and the Baptism of the Lord! Only the day after the Lord’s baptism do we return to Ordinary Time in the Church’s calendar.

At his Baptism, Jesus’ public ministry begins, with the hidden life at Nazareth for the most part left behind. On this feast the emphasis is on Jesus entering the Jordan River, receiving baptism from John the Baptist and the proclamation of who Jesus of Nazareth is. The work of John the Baptist, baptizing in water only, comes to an end, and the baptism in the Holy Spirit and fire now comes to the fore in the person of Jesus Christ.

While King and Messiah, Jesus is at the same time and always is, servant of all. Endowed with the Holy Spirit, the saving mission of Jesus is realized through meekness and peace. The Lord does not bring oppression, but a reign of justice on earth, a reign that is symbolized in opening the eyes of the blind and bringing freedom to prisoners. God’s covenant and promises of old to our ancestors in the faith are now embodied in Jesus Christ, Redeemer of all people. In a word, Christ is the light of the nations.

In the second lesson at Mass from the Acts of the Apostles, Peter mentions Jesus’ baptism as his Messianic anointing with the Spirit of God. As God’s Anointed One, Jesus “went about doing good works and healing all who were in the grip of the devil, and God was with him” (Acts 10:38).

It is true that Jesus had God’s Spirit from all eternity and that his being anointed cannot be pinpointed to any particular moment of his life on earth. Nonetheless, the baptism in the River Jordan can be considered as the moment when Jesus’ Messiahship, thus far hidden, is revealed and manifest to the nations, beginning in Israel. The Baptism of Jesus can be called the starting point of his Messianic career or vocation, the beginning of a new stage in the history of salvation.

The Gospels tell us that at the Baptism of Jesus, the skies opened, a way of indicating that God is “coming down,” in a tangible way. God’s Holy Spirit is intimately involved in this reality and a the voice from heaven confirms the divine presence in what is taking place, that is, salvation by God, which is what the name, Jesus, literally means. The new and final era in salvation history begins with Jesus, and a new people are and will be until the end of time, born in Christ.

As the Church Year unfolds in the following Sundays of Ordinary Time, we will hear and ponder the words and works of the Spirit-filled Son of God, Jesus Christ, Second Person of the Blessed Trinity. Jesus calls us to faith in himself, which will grow out of continual conversion and turning of self over to God. Thereby we enter God’s Kingdom.

God declares to us whenever we hear Sacred Scripture, the Bible, especially the Gospels, who is the Savior whom God has sent. We pray that we might be more and more be filled with a deep appreciation of the inexhaustible love of God lavished upon us in Jesus Christ.

As we read and hear the Gospels in the coming days, weeks and months, as we ponder Scripture in the solitude of the monastic cell, prayer corner at home or in church, we should be contemplating the presence and person of Jesus of Nazareth, proclaimed as God’s “beloved Son,” in whom God the Father is “well pleased,” as the Gospel today describes it. God’s pleasure also includes our being redeemed in the blood of Christ and being led to eternal life.

We should freely and joyfully (“may God protect me from gloomy saints,” as Saint Teresa of Avila said) commit ourselves to Jesus Christ totally and find our deepest joy and delight in the person and saving power of the Lord.

The grace we received at baptism as children or when we were older, is constantly going to work in our spiritual lives, enlivened by the sacraments we receive throughout our lives, especially the Eucharist and Penance or Confession. Our own baptism, which we should be thinking about on this day of recounting the Lord’s baptism, should make hope in God a reality, who asks us to share the best part of ourselves with the world family of Jesus’ followers, but also with those not of our faith or of no faith.

We end the Christmas season by commemorating the Baptism of Jesus and our own rebirth at baptism. We are enjoying now and for eternity what the prophets and people of old long to see. The eyes of faith open up this possibility.

May the Lord help us in this year already underway, to conform our thoughts, desires, words and actions to the ways of God. May we grow to full maturity as the Lord’s disciples, in good times and bad, in joy and in sorrow, as life unfolds each day.

Prior Christian Leisy, OSB

Monastery of Christ in the Desert

Abiquiu, New Mexico

Benedictine Abbey of Christ in the Desert

Baptism of the Lord, January 10, 2016

Baptism of the Lord, January 10, 2016
Scripture Readings: Isaiah 42:1-4, 6-7; Acts of the Apostles 10:34-38; Mark 1:7-11At

With the liturgical celebration of the Baptism of the Lord the beautiful Christmas season draws to a close. Yes, monks keep the Manger Scene in church and Christmas decorations up until now, still singing Christmas carols and keeping a
(Please click below to read the complete news item.)
https://christdesert.org/2016/01/baptism-of-the-lord-january-10-2016/

Benedictine Abbey of Christ in the Desert Scripture Readings: Isaiah 42:1-4, 6-7; Acts of the Apostles 10:34-38; Mark 1:7-11At

With the liturgical celebration of the Baptism of the Lord the beautiful Christmas season draws to a close. Yes, monks keep the Manger Scene in church and Christmas decorations up until now, still singing Christmas carols and keeping a festive mood, long after the secular society has ceased, probably as early as December 26th. A pity, when there is still so much to celebrate between Christmas and the Baptism of the Lord! Only the day after the Lord’s baptism do we return to Ordinary Time in the Church’s calendar.

At his Baptism, Jesus’ public ministry begins, with the hidden life at Nazareth for the most part left behind. On this feast the emphasis is on Jesus entering the Jordan River, receiving baptism from John the Baptist and the proclamation of who Jesus of Nazareth is. The work of John the Baptist, baptizing in water only, comes to an end, and the baptism in the Holy Spirit and fire now comes to the fore in the person of Jesus Christ.

While King and Messiah, Jesus is at the same time and always is, servant of all. Endowed with the Holy Spirit, the saving mission of Jesus is realized through meekness and peace. The Lord does not bring oppression, but a reign of justice on earth, a reign that is symbolized in opening the eyes of the blind and bringing freedom to prisoners. God’s covenant and promises of old to our ancestors in the faith are now embodied in Jesus Christ, Redeemer of all people. In a word, Christ is the light of the nations.

In the second lesson at Mass from the Acts of the Apostles, Peter mentions Jesus’ baptism as his Messianic anointing with the Spirit of God. As God’s Anointed One, Jesus “went about doing good works and healing all who were in the grip of the devil, and God was with him” (Acts 10:38).

It is true that Jesus had God’s Spirit from all eternity and that his being anointed cannot be pinpointed to any particular moment of his life on earth. Nonetheless, the baptism in the River Jordan can be considered as the moment when Jesus’ Messiahship, thus far hidden, is revealed and manifest to the nations, beginning in Israel. The Baptism of Jesus can be called the starting point of his Messianic career or vocation, the beginning of a new stage in the history of salvation.

The Gospels tell us that at the Baptism of Jesus, the skies opened, a way of indicating that God is “coming down,” in a tangible way. God’s Holy Spirit is intimately involved in this reality and a the voice from heaven confirms the divine presence in what is taking place, that is, salvation by God, which is what the name, Jesus, literally means. The new and final era in salvation history begins with Jesus, and a new people are and will be until the end of time, born in Christ.

As the Church Year unfolds in the following Sundays of Ordinary Time, we will hear and ponder the words and works of the Spirit-filled Son of God, Jesus Christ, Second Person of the Blessed Trinity. Jesus calls us to faith in himself, which will grow out of continual conversion and turning of self over to God. Thereby we enter God’s Kingdom.

God declares to us whenever we hear Sacred Scripture, the Bible, especially the Gospels, who is the Savior whom God has sent. We pray that we might be more and more be filled with a deep appreciation of the inexhaustible love of God lavished upon us in Jesus Christ.

As we read and hear the Gospels in the coming days, weeks and months, as we ponder Scripture in the solitude of the monastic cell, prayer corner at home or in church, we should be contemplating the presence and person of Jesus of Nazareth, proclaimed as God’s “beloved Son,” in whom God the Father is “well pleased,” as the Gospel today describes it. God’s pleasure also includes our being redeemed in the blood of Christ and being led to eternal life.

We should freely and joyfully (“may God protect me from gloomy saints,” as Saint Teresa of Avila said) commit ourselves to Jesus Christ totally and find our deepest joy and delight in the person and saving power of the Lord.

The grace we received at baptism as children or when we were older, is constantly going to work in our spiritual lives, enlivened by the sacraments we receive throughout our lives, especially the Eucharist and Penance or Confession. Our own baptism, which we should be thinking about on this day of recounting the Lord’s baptism, should make hope in God a reality, who asks us to share the best part of ourselves with the world family of Jesus’ followers, but also with those not of our faith or of no faith.

We end the Christmas season by commemorating the Baptism of Jesus and our own rebirth at baptism. We are enjoying now and for eternity what the prophets and people of old long to see. The eyes of faith open up this possibility.

May the Lord help us in this year already underway, to conform our thoughts, desires, words and actions to the ways of God. May we grow to full maturity as the Lord’s disciples, in good times and bad, in joy and in sorrow, as life unfolds each day.

Prior Christian Leisy, OSB

Monastery of Christ in the Desert

Abiquiu, New Mexico

Benedictine Abbey of Christ in the Desert

Abbot's Notebook for January 6, 2016

Abbot's Notebook for January 6, 2016
Blessings to you! I am sitting in the Albuquerque Airport on my way to Tucson, where I will be on Wednesday, the usual day when this Notebook is published. I will be in Tucson at the Redemptorist Renewal Center in Tucson for a week, giving a retreat. As often happens,
(Please click below to read the complete news item.)
https://christdesert.org/2016/01/abbots-notebook-for-january-6-2016/

Benedictine Abbey of Christ in the Desert Blessings to you! I am sitting in the Albuquerque Airport on my way to Tucson, where I will be on Wednesday, the usual day when this Notebook is published. I will be in Tucson at the Redemptorist Renewal Center in Tucson for a week, giving a retreat. As often happens, I write this Notebook earlier because I am not sure what type of internet connection I will have at that facility.

At home, as usual, there are lots of things happening. Several brothers went to a funeral in Albuquerque on Saturday. We don’t usually do that, but there are always exceptions. It is easy to imagine that we would be asked to lots and lots of funerals if we always went. So we are discreet and reluctant, in order to preserve our monastic vocation. While the brothers were in Albuquerque, they also collected Brother Augustine, who was returning from a discernment session in Houston.

I left the Monastery on Sunday after an early community Mass so that I could fly from Albuquerque to Phoenix and from there to Tucson. The flight from Albuquerque was pretty good, although we sat on the runway in Phoenix for almost a half an hour. Then the flight to Tucson was delayed for an hour and a half. When we arrived Tucson, there was a Knight of Columbus to meet us and he went with us and another Knight to home of the local bishop. Most. Rev. Gerald Kicanas, who had dinner for eight bishops and myself.

On Monday at home the first group of brothers went to Rancho de las Paz, at Deming, New Mexico, so 25 miles from the border with Mexico. We will be having four different groups of brothers taking a winter break there over the next couple of months. This a 55 acre property with three buildings on it. The owner would like to give it to a religious community that could use it in some form as a religious center. We will evaluate our experiences there in a few months. At present, it does not seem that we could integrate it into our regular life, but we shall see.

On Monday also five brothers went to Houston, Texas, for a four day course on Gregorian Chant. These kinds of workshops really help our community with out singing. You know that we sing Gregorian Chant in Latin for the Mass on alternate days and sing Chant in English on the other days. So the more chant that our brothers can know, the better it helps our choir.

The retreat that I am leading is about the Year of Mercy. It is easy enough to speak about mercy and yet it is difficult to specify what it might mean in a concrete situation. Probably for many of us, mercy means a lenient attitude towards mistakes and even towards sins. I have never been convinced that that is its truest meaning in the Scriptures, but have been put to work to read more and study the Scriptures more so that I can try to present a coherent meaning of mercy and what it might mean in a Jubilee Year of Mercy.

Mercy, by one dictionary definition, is kind or forgiving treatment of someone who could be treated harshly. If we look at the scriptures of our Jewish ancestors in the faith, our Old Testament, we find two words there which are quite often translated eventually as mercy. One of those words indicates love for another person, a kind regard for another person, but in a very faithful and steady way. The faithfulness is to the other person but also to oneself. A second word which can also be translated as mercy is the love that a mother has for her child. This kind of mercy is felt in the body, in the intestines, in the guts. Both of these words together give a very strong sense of mercy.

Real mercy seems to have two aspects: one is a real sin or injustice or illegality that has been committed and the other a response to that sin or injustice or illegality which is less than it merited. That is why it looks like leniency. On the other hand, if there is no sin or injustice or illegality, then there can be no mercy.

All of this makes us reflect on our own sinfulness which is basically an injustice to God. So if we deny God’s existence, then we cannot receive God’s mercy and be aware of it. Or if we deny that we have any obligation to God, we cannot receive God’s mercy and be aware of it. At one level, because of our sinfulness, we should simply not exist because we are always unfaithful to the Lord. At another point, in God’s mercy, He allows us to live because he does not hold our sins against us. Yet God wants us to repent and to seek Him with our whole being.

So we have this image, this reality, of God longing for us, seeking us out, bering merciful to us—and ourselves resisting His love and mercy. This is not entirely true because there is in most of us something that longs to be with the Lord, something that wants to follow the Lord and do His will—even when we are not entirely faithful to it. We humans are complex and even more complex by our sinfulness.

The wonder and the miracle of God’s love for us is what we celebrate at Christmas and throughout the Christmas Season which for us Catholics continue through this coming Sunday, when we celebrate the Baptism of Jesus.

Why would God ever love us? Because His love is faithful and also the love of a mother for her child. This is the kind of love that our God has for us and there is no other God. We can think of Moses when he saw the burning bush and God revealed Himself to Him. We can think of Abraham and Sarah and God visited them. We can think of the Prophets or of King David. All of these people point forward to the coming of a Messiah, who is Jesus our Lord. Our challenge is to accept that love, to rejoice in that love and to spend our lives trying to respond to that God.

As always I ask your prayers for me, especially as I give this retreat. But I always need your prayers. I promise to pray for you and will offer a Holy Mass for you and for your needs and intentions. I send you my love and prayers.

Your brother in the Lord,

Abbot Philip

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Location

Address

1305 Forest Service Rd 151, P O Box 270
Abiquiu, NM
87510
Other Religious Organizations in Abiquiu (show all)
The Monastery Candle Shop The Monastery Candle Shop
PO Box 270
Abiquiu, 08751

Candles made by the monks of Christ in the Desert

Ghost Ranch Youth Service Corps Ghost Ranch Youth Service Corps
280 Private Drive 1708
Abiquiu, 87510

The Ghost Ranch Youth Service Corps (YSC) is a program which exposes groups or individuals to service learning in the Northern New Mexico community.