Peace Centre and Community Development

Peace Centre and Community Development

PCCD is a Multicultural, a non profit, non political party and non government organization. It is a humanitarian and Community Based Organization of Volunteers, founded in 2002 by friends (Quakers) in Tanzania.

Peace promotion among people so to facilitate great socio economic development in the country, Conflict prevention and violence reduction in micro, meso and macro levels, Disease control and prevention among children and youths and Poverty Reduction and self-reliance among people of Tanzania.

Main program objectives • . To provide peace education to 6,000 people among our community by 2015 • . To Reduce and prevent conflict among groups, community and national levels through peaceful dialogue and reconciliation. • .To Restore mental, physical and social peace among victims of violence through psycho-social care giving • . To train 6,000 children and youth on HIV/STD prevention • .To Reduce stigma affecting people living with HIV/AIDS due to bad culture and beliefs from people in the community by 10% up to 2013 • .To prevent new HIV infection to people up to 30% through condoms distribution up to 2013 • To improve better life standard of disadvantages targeted people through vocational training skills, sustainable agriculture and micro finance project.

Mission: Our mission is to reduce and prevent violent action due to cultural, political, economic and religious conflict among people in our community in both micro, meso and macro levels. Furthermore, it is concerned with poverty reduction as one of the country problem leading to hunger, disease, low education and unemployment among many Tanzanian.

[12/31/19]   Warumi 5:1-2
[1]Basi tukiisha kuhesabiwa haki itokayo katika imani, na mwe na amani kwa Mungu, kwa njia ya Bwana wetu Yesu Kristo,
[2]ambaye kwa yeye tumepata kwa njia ya imani kuifikia neema hii ambayo mnasimama ndani yake; na kufurahi katika tumaini la utukufu wa Mungu.

[03/22/19]   PEACE BE WITH YOU ALL

[11/15/18]   Peace I leave with you; My peace I give to you; not as the world gives, do I give to you. Let not your heart be troubled, nor let it be fearful.

~ John 14:27

[11/15/18]   The LORD gives strength to his people; the LORD blesses his people with peace.

~ Psalm 29:11

[11/15/18]   Psalm 29:11. Turn from evil and do good; seek peace

Greetings to everyone!

We are very pleased to announce that the KiSwahili version of the Basic AVP manual is now available on the website, thanks to the hard work of AVP-Tanzania and Bronwen Hillman.

best wishes
Grateful Grazyna

Grazyna Bonati
14b Clarence Road
Bounds Green
London N22 8PL
UK

[06/15/18]   Love is the greatest commandment. The Bible says, love the Neighbors as we love ourselves.
Mark 12:31
The second is this: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no other commandment greater than these.”
Matthew 22:36-40
“Teacher, which is the great commandment in the Law?” And he said to him, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with allyour mind. This is the great and first commandment. And a second is like it: You shall love your neighbor as yourself. On these two commandments depend all the Law and the Prophets.”
Romans 13:8 Owe no one anything, except to love each other, for the one who loves another has fulfilled the law.
Who is the neighbor? Is anybody who is near you; and especially those who are in needy.

[05/15/18]   Peace be with you all

Amani! Amani! Amani ya Kristo Yesu

“Acheni amani ya Kristo idhibiti mioyoni mwenu, kwa maana nyinyi, kwa kweli, mliitiwa hiyo katika mwili mmoja.”—WAKOLOSAI 3:15.

data.unicef.org

Literacy - UNICEF DATA

Peace Center and Community Development (PCCD)

Peace Center and Community Development Literacy Program (PCCDLP)

Prepared by Peace Center and Community Development (PCCD), Building Capacity Department
© 2017
1. PROGRAM SUMMARY
Tanzania youth literacy population rate stands at 68%, male literacy population rate stands at 75% and female literacy population rate stands at 61% in 2010 (UNICEF, 2015). It implies that Tanzania youth illiteracy population rate stands at 32%, male illiteracy population rate stands at 25% and female illiteracy population rate stands at 39% in 2010. Reports reveal that Tanzania youth literacy population rate was lower than global youth literacy rate and Tanzania youth illiteracy population rate was higher than global youth literacy rate.
The program Peace Center and Community Development Literacy Program (PCCDLP) intends to emancipate 3,000 beneficiaries in Kigoma region from ignorance and dependence syndromes in a period of 10 years from 2017 to 2027.
The above mentioned will be achieved by conducting 10 months training on literacy and numeracy skills to 300 beneficiaries once per year x 10 times, conducting 3 program progressiveness monitoring and evaluations per each 10 months x 10 times and conducting certificates preparedness and conferring once per each 10 months x 10 times.
Program will put in use total TZS 194,200,000; TZS 25,375,000 from PCCD, TZS 26,575,000 from trainees and TZS 142,250,000 from local and international donors.

2. PROBLEM BACKGROUND
The global youth literacy rate stands 85 percent, literacy male world population rate stands at 89 percent, while literacy female world population rate stands at 81 percent in 2013 (UNICEF, 2015). This implies that illiteracy world population rate stands at 9 percent, illiteracy male world population rate stands at 11, while illiteracy female world population stands at 19 percent in 2013 (PCCD, 2017).
Regional and gender disparities persist, however. Literacy is lowest in least developed countries and higher among males than females. In the most recent years for which data are available, young women accounted for 59 percent of the total illiterate youth population (UNICEF, 2015).
The Sub-Saharan Africa youth literacy rate stands at 60 percent, literacy male population rate stands at 69, while literacy female population rate stands at 50 percent in 2013 (UNICEF, 2015). The reports reveal that youth illiteracy rate stands at 40 percent, illiteracy male population stands at 31 percent while illiteracy female population stands at 50 percent in 2013 (PCCD, 2017).
Tanzania youth literacy population rate stands at 68%, male literacy population rate stands at 75% and female literacy population rate stands at 61% in 2010 (UNICEF, 2015). It implies that Tanzania youth illiteracy population rate stands at 32%, male illiteracy population rate stands at 25% and female illiteracy population rate stands at 39% in 2010. Reports reveal that Tanzania youth literacy population rate was lower than global youth literacy rate and Tanzania youth illiteracy population rate was higher than global youth literacy rate (PCCD, 2017).
The need for Peace Center and Community Development Literacy Program (PCCDLP) originated to respond to the outcry of local and international communities on rescuing local and global illiterate populations.
3. PROBLEM STATEMENT
3.1 Illiteracy Magnitude in Tanzania
Tanzania youth literacy population rate stands at 68%, male literacy population rate stands at 75% and female literacy population rate stands at 61% in 2010 (UNICEF, 2015). It implies that Tanzania youth illiteracy population rate stands at 32%, male illiteracy population rate stands at 25% and female illiteracy population rate stands at 39% in 2010 (PCCD, 2017).
Not only there been considerable relapse into illiteracy and an increase in illiterate adults but there is now a rising number of young people completing primary and secondary schools without mastering 3Rs (The Citizen, 2017).
3.2 Causes of Increasing Illiteracy
No attending to school
It is estimated that there are 5,162,195 (24%) children aged 5-17 years who do not attend school in Tanzania, majority of whom are based in the rural areas where they comprise of 4,433,209 children or 86% of all children not attending school (ILO, 2001).
Child labor
Out of the total estimated 11,965,146 children of the age between 5-17 years in Tanzania, 4,735,528 (39.6%) were reported to have worked in economic activities, while 5,721,496 (47.8%) were engaged in housekeeping activities. It is obviously undesirable as well as detrimental to schooling, social, mental, spiritual and moral development when the child works for long hours (ILO, 2001).
Unemployment
The status in employment filter is limited by the fact that it omits unpaid family workers, who are majority in the Tanzanian setting, not only constituting 50% of Tanzanians living under international poverty line of 1$ per day, but also contributing 78.8 percent of the working children (ILO, 2001).
3.3 Consequences of Illiteracy
i. Insufficient access to the right to information due to failure of reading leaflets, billboards, articles, newspapers and journals.
ii. Insufficient participation in social change processes such as family planning programs, elimination of negative traditional practices, early marriage, gender equality and alternative to violence programs.
iii. Inactive participation in social movements so that to assert their deprived rights.
iv. Inactive participation in public development issues such as public expenditure tracking, community livelihood empowerments, educational improvement programs and disease controlling.
v. Poor engagements in national and international declarations, conventions and charters such as Sustainable Development Goals (SPGs), Human Rights Convention, Child Rights Conventions and African Charter on Rights and Welfare of a child.
vi. Insufficient participation in political affairs and accessing political rights such as right to vote and be voted.

4. PROGRAM BENIFICIARIES
Peace Center and Community Development Literacy Program (PCCDLP) aims at reaching 3,000 beneficiaries in Kigoma region. Among them 1,562 are males and 1,438 females. Regarding to age group; 2,000 are 4-5 age group, 500 are 6-17 age group and 500 are 18 and above age group.
Table 1: Program Beneficiaries by Sex
Total Beneficiaries Male Beneficiaries Female Beneficiaries
3,000 1,562 1,438

Table 2: Program Beneficiaries by Age Group
Total Beneficiaries 4-5 Age Group 6-17 Age Group 18 and above Age Group
3,000 2,000 500 500

5. PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
5.1 OVERALL OBJECTIVE
The program Peace Center and Community Development Literacy Program (PCCDLP) intends to emancipate 3,000 beneficiaries in Kigoma region from ignorance and dependence syndromes in a period of 10 years from 2017 to 2027.
5.2 SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES
i. To empower 3,000 beneficiaries in Kigoma region in literacy and numeracy skills in a period of 10 years from 2017 to 2027.
ii. To give a room to 3,000 beneficiaries in Kigoma region to participate in processes that promotes their self-growth and self-reliance in a period of 10 years from 2017 to 2027.
iii. To eliminate ignorance and dependence syndromes to 3,000 beneficiaries in Kigoma region in a period of 10 years from 2017 to 2027.
6. METHODOLOGIES AND ACTIVITIES
i. Conduct 10 months training on literacy and numeracy skills to 300 beneficiaries once per year x 10 times.
ii. Conduct 3 program progressiveness monitoring and evaluations per each 10 months x 10 times.
iii. Conduct certificates preparedness and conferring once per each 10 months x 10 times.

7. PROGRAM OUTCOMES
i. Improved literacy and numeracy skills to 3,000 beneficiaries in Kigoma region in a period of 10 years from 2017 to 2027.
ii. Reduced illiteracy and innumeracy rate by 10 percent from 32 percent to 22 percent and increased literacy and numeracy rate by 10 percent from 68 to 78 percent in Tanzania in a period of 10 years from 2017 to 2027.
iii. Increased independence and pro-social syndromes to 3,000 beneficiaries in Kigoma region in a period of 10 years from 2017 to 2027.
iv. Promoted self-growth, self-reliance, self-esteem and self-respect to 3,000 beneficiaries in Kigoma region in a period of 10 years from 2017 to 2027.

8. MONITROING AND EVALUATION
The beneficiaries of the project PCCDLG will be assessed at four levels of literacy and numeracy advancements; Pre-Program Assessment (PPA), End of the Session Assessment (ESA), Middle of the Program Assessment (MPA) and Post-Program Assessment.
8.1 Definitions
Pre-Program Assessment (PPA) – beneficiaries of the project PCCDLG will be assessed before joining literacy program so that to understand their academic intelligences. Their psychometric score will be recorded in their Individual Assessment Plans (IAP). This Baseline Survey will help facilitators to design project curriculum and sessions that fit much better trainee’s levels of academic performances.
End of the Session Assessment (ESA) – beneficiaries of the project PCCDLG will be assessed at the end of every study session so that understand their session masteries. It will help trainers to reinforce whatever went well, rectify whatever went wrong and clarify ambiguities and misunderstandings.
Middle of the Program Assessment (MPA) - beneficiaries of the project PCCDLG will be assessed at the middle of program so that to understand their middle academic developments. It will help trainers to continue or modify their teaching methodologies and techniques.
Post-Program Assessment - beneficiaries of the project PCCDLG will be assessed at the end of program so that to grade and certify beneficiaries. It will help program coordinator in preparedness and conferring participation certificates.
8.2 Monitoring and Evaluation Methodologies
Paper-pencil questionnaire and Oral questionnaire will be applied in monitoring and evaluation processes. The trainers will be responsible in designing monitoring and evaluation questions, administrating trainees’ responses, processing, grading and certifying trainees’ scores and reporting monitoring and evaluation results to program coordinator.
9. PROGRAM SUSTAINABILTY
The beneficiaries of Peace Center and Community Development Literacy Program (PCCDLP) required contributing monthly program running fee that will be handed over program coordinator. This will make Peace Center and Community Development Literacy Program (PCCDLP) sustainable.
Further, beneficiaries of Peace Center and Community Development Literacy Program (PCCDLP) will empower other potential beneficiaries at their own times and potential beneficiaries will empower others and others. Therefore, the program impacts will not dry out with direct beneficiaries rather they will be redone over decades.
Furthermore, Peace Center and Community Development (PCCD) will have been implementing future funding through fundraising and writing proposals. By doing so, Peace Center and Community Development will make Peace Center and Community Development Literacy Program (PCCDLP) sustainable.
10. PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION AND MANAGEMNET
The program will be implemented in 10 intakes each intake will last for 10 months
Execution and administration of the program Peace Center and Community Development Literacy Program (PCCDLP) will involve five personnel; program coordinator, program accountant and three trainers.
Program Coordinator will be in charge of the execution and administration of the program Peace Center and Community Development Literacy Program (PCCDLP). He or she will be responsible for recruitment, direction and harmonization of all three program trainers. He or she will be responsible for any conflict resolution and management, whenever happen between all stakeholders before PCCD Executive Director.
Program Accountant will be responsible for all financial affairs of this program Peace Center and Community Development Literacy Program (PCCDLP) after being assigned to those financial tasks by Program Coordinator.
Three trainers will be responsible for facilitating training and assessments that will be undertaken at three levels of program developments. They will also be responsible for any other program related tasks after being assigned to by Program Coordinator.
11. TIMESCALE
Table 3: Program Timescale
Starting Data January 15, 2017
Ending Data December 1, 2027

12. REFERENCES
ILO, (2001) Child Labour in Tanzania: Country Report. National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) & Ministry of Labour, Youth Development and Sports: Der as Salam, Tanzania.
PCCD, (2017) Peace Center and Community Development Literacy Program (PCCDLP). (Unpublished material): Kigoma, Tanzania.
UNICEF, (2015) Literacy – UNICEF DATA. Retrieved from http://data.unicef.org/topic/eduaction/literacy/ on July 22, 201

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Peace Centre and Community Development

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BLESSED are they who give without expecting even thanks in return, for they shall be abundantly rewarded.
BLESSED are they who translate every good thing they know into action - even higher truths shall be revealed to them.
BLESSED are they who do God's will without asking to see results, for great shall be their recompense.
BLESSED are they who love and trust their fellow human beings, for they shall reach the good in people and receive a loving response.
BLESSED are they who have seen reality, for they know that not the garment of clay but that which activates the garment of clay is real and indestructible.
BLESSED are they who see the change we call death as a liberation from the limitations of this earth-life, for they shall rejoice with their loved ones who make the glorious transition.
BLESSED are they who after dedicating their lives and thereby receiving a blessing have the courage and faith to surmount the difficulties of the path ahead, for they shall receive a second blessing.
BLESSED are they who advance toward the spiritual path without the selfish motive of seeking inner peace, for they shall find it.
BLESSED are those who instead of trying to batter down the gates of the kingdom of heaven approach them humbly and lovingly and purified, for they shall pass right through.
GOD BLESS PEACE MAKERS
We site: https://quakerspccdtz.org

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[03/05/15]   “Courageous people do not fear forgiving for the sake of peace” - Nelson Mandela

Peace Centre and Community Development's cover photo

[08/30/14]   Peace Centre and Community Development (PCCD)

Alternative to Violence Project is PCCD project
Tanzania is one of East African community countries with a population of more than 44 million people. It is a country of multi cultural diversity and multi religious belief but only it is dominated by Muslims and Christians religions. AVP (Alternative to Violence Project) initiatives were introduced to Tanzania, especially in Kigoma region by Mr. Emmanuel Haraka collaborating with Quakers seeing several religious conflict incidences occurring in Kigoma district between Muslims and Christians. This religious conflict was characterised as latent conflict which was boiling down and manifesting some sort of hatred between Muslims and Christians to the extent of dividing the society. Then, during Quaker Peace Network East Africa first meeting in Tororo, Uganda, March17-19, 2006, Mr. Emmanuel Haraka was invited to the meeting where he met Mr. David Zerembuka, Africa Great Lakes Initiatives coordinator who has shown the concern to fund alternative to violence project in Tanzania, Kigoma region to reduce religious conflict.

In September 06, 2006, first alternative to violence workshops funded by AGLI (Africa Great Lakes Initiatives) under auspices of Mr. David Zerembuka took place. A total of 7 workshops were held, 2 basic, 1 advanced, 1 TOT and 3 apprenticeships workshops to integrate and practice AVP skill and knowledge among 16 trainees who completed training of trainers and qualified. Two apprenticeships took place in Kigoma urban and one in Congolese Lugufu refugee camp. During this workshops, Malesi Kinaro, Gettry Agiza from Kenya and Emmanuel Haraka were trainers. Hence AVP committee was formed in Kigoma in order to manage, facilitate and coordinate AVP activities in Tanzania.

Then, on August 14-17, 2008, Pastor Simba Ulanga a former Imam/Sheikh converted into Christianity, from Pentecostal churches of Tanzania conducted Evangelical Crusade in Nguruka which resulted in 30 Muslims conversion into Christianity on the spot things that irritated Muslims and planned to attack Christians for the purpose of evicting them from Nguruka village. Then, Sunday, 17 August, 2008, Muslims attacked Christians in their churches during Sunday worship. They have thrown stones on roofs of the churches. Christian fellows came out and they resisted against. The fight erupted and caused many severe injuries among both Christians and Muslims, before the Police stopped the fighting. Many of Christians and Muslims themselves were wounded and admitted in hospital for treatment. Thereafter, police has intervened and some of the perpetrators of the violence were arrested by the police.
Still the conflict was there although police has helped to stop violence between two the parties in confrontation. Anger, sorrow and hatred among both Christians and Muslims were still there and it was observed in the community as the society was already divided into two blocks. Hence, having seeing the way conflict was evolving, we decided as AVP Volunteers to intervene so to restore trust and community cooperation and religious tolerance at Nguruka village.

Thereafter, Mr. Emmanuel Haraka has seen the need to raise fund for organising and conducting alternative to violence project in Kigoma region. Mr. Emmanuel Haraka has entered in contact with Mr. David Zerembuka, the coordinator of AGLI (Africa Great Lakes Initiatives) to negotiate the possibility of funding second alternative to violence project so to intervene toward stopping, ending and preventing religious conflict in Nguruka village and Kigoma urban.
In 2008, 19th November to 2nd December, 3 basic workshops were conducted at Maweni, Kibirizi Kigoma urban and Nguruka village a total of 61(29f/32m) participants both Christian and Muslims, local leaders were trained in alternative to violence, and 44 (17f/27m) participants Christians and Muslims as well as local leaders completed advanced workshop and 16 (5f/11m) among them qualified as AVP facilitator. These advanced workshops took place in Kibirizi Kigoma urban and Nguruka village and TOT at Kibirizi again; so in total 121(51f/70m) people were trained in AVP. During these trainings, Melesi Kinaro, and Job Sirari from Kenya and Emmanuel Haraka, Joel Songambele, David Dunia, Nelson Mandela, Juma Jocker, Justin Komanya, Amani Asisa, and Faliala Mchungamali have facilitated these workshops.

In the same year 2008, Emmanuel Haraka, Joel Songambele, Dunia David and few other people felt the need to continue AVP initiatives under a given legal umbrella and from there founded an organisation named “PCCD (Peace Centre and Community Development) whose mission will be conflict prevention, Democracy and Human rights promotion and Poverty Reduction in Tanzania. Two years later, May, 28th 2010, the organisation was officially registered and in 2010, in July 15th to 17, 2 basic workshops were conducted at Mwandiga Kigoma urban and Bubango village. A total of 44 (12f/32m) participants ranging from Christians, Muslims and local leaders were trained in AVP under the organisation umbrella. During these trainings, Siasa Barakabitse, Joel Songambele,Juma Jocker Dunia David, Anthony Marcel , Justine Komanya, Nelson Mandela, Rugagaza and Emmanuel Haraka facilitated these workshops.

In October 30, 2010, under the organisation, CAPPI (Change Agent for Peace International) funded general country election observation and monitoring.

Achievements

• Establishment of 2 peace committees in Nguruka and Bubango villages which contribute in promoting peace and preventing circular and religious conflict at domestic and community levels.
• Aggressive behaviour and negative attitude change among people in the community to non violent behaviour through alternative to violence awareness and learning in the villages.
• Community affirmation, cooperation and trust, mutual tolerance and development among both Christians and Muslims peoples.
• AVP Knowledge and skills among people in the community.
• Community trust and cooperation restoration in Nguruka village.

Success story:
One young woman Amisa who has domestic problems with the husband shared with us during one of the workshops that after the T.P discussions she went home and for the first time they had a peaceful and civil discussion with the husband on their marital issues. “She felt the change”

Challenges
a) Many international NGOs provide participation allowance to participant that AVP do not do which results in participants being reluctant to attend AVP workshops.
b) AVP training manual or guide needs be translated in Swahili so to facilitate quick transfer of knowledge and skill by facilitators to the participants. Here the issue is the fund for translation and printing.
c) Lack of AVP fund to complete, strengthen and spread AVP in other regions of Tanzania where religious conflict turned into violence between Muslims and Christians resulted in Pastor Mathayo Kachili of Assembly’s God Church beheaded, let many other Christians wounded and hospitalised including their meat butchers burnt to ground by Muslims in Geita region.
d) Most of the victims of religious violence suffer trauma and obviously are in need of psycho-social support that AVP’s facilitators can not handle.

Way forward

1. Country constitutional Referendum election observation and monitoring, this year 2014.
2. Country General (Parliamentary and presidential) observation and monitoring, 2015.
3. Conduct AVP workshops and establish peace committees in Geita region where Christians and Muslims conflict has created apartheid already and we are worrying can result in direct violence. The government has done some intervening action but this is not enough we need to intervene.
4. Need to complete AVP work started in Nguruka, Bubango villages and Kigoma urban. There is need to continue with some basic, advanced and T of T workshops.
5. Supervision of established peace committees and continue with capacity building.
6. Conduct capacity building of AVP lead facilitators on trauma-healing, reconstruction and counselling.
7. Fundraising.
8. Collaboration and Networking with international AVP program.
9. Translating AVP training manual or guide in Swahili and printings.
10. Conduct AVP meetings and gatherings.
11. AVP Spread over and strengthening in Tanzania.
12. To attend AVP International Gathering.
13. Attend Quaker Peace Network Africa Conference.

We are grateful to AGLI (African Great Lakes Peace Initiative) especially Mr. David Zerembuka, Quaker peace Network Africa, CAPPI (change Peace program international), and Bev- Young for your generous support for without you we could not achieve the above mentioned results. Many thanks to Malesi Kinaro, Gettry Agiza and Job Sirari for having strengthening AVP Kigoma team of facilitators for without you we would not be qualified as AVP lead facilitators. Thank you once again CAPPI for supporting 2010 country general election. For without your support this could not be possible.
Thank you and Happy New Year 2014.

On behalf of AVP Team,

Emmanuel Haraka
AVP Coordinator, Lead Facilitator
Director PCCD-Tanzania

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