Cebu Center for Ignatian Spirituality - Jesuit Retreat House

Cebu Center for Ignatian Spirituality - Jesuit Retreat House

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Today 103th anniversary of the apparition of our lady of Fatima! Mama Mary pray for us! Cover us w/your blue mantle pf protection against the covid 19...
All good wishes and Prayers for the future restoration of the Jesuit Retreat House, Cebu, a second Home in my formation years.
Thank you so much for this. I have been looking for a retreat house for a long time with regular activities. :)

A sacred space for prayer and reflection, with retreat and formation programs anchored on the Gospels and Ignatian Spirituality. Located along Good Shepherd Road in Banawa Hills, Cebu City.

Jesuit Retreat House Cebu is a community of Jesuits and partner religious nuns and lay persons dedicated to the promotion of the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola, training retreat guides and directors for the renewal and transformation of individuals. We have various types of retreats, formative workshops and collaboration ministries. Ideally located in Banawa Hills overlooking the City, the Jesuit Retreat House is a centre of prayer for men and women who seek continuing conversion of life and desire a deeper commitment to God in Christian service to neighbour. The wooden structure is modest, the facilities and amenities are simple. But the silence and peace that pervades the house, coupled with ample landscapes provide an ideal atmosphere for prayer and reflection. Since it foundation in 1963, the Jesuit Retreat House Cebu has provided for the spiritual renewal of priests, religious brothers and sisters, seminarians as well as lay persons, giving priority to those who are particularly effective in leading others towards spiritual awakening and renewal.

Operating as usual

12/04/2021

LIVE | Chronos et Kairos (Dance Drama) - 500 YoC Cebu Cultural Show

Watch Bishop Barron's Newest Feature-Length Film 07/04/2021

Watch Bishop Barron's Newest Feature-Length Film

Inviting friends, benefactors and mission partners to watch this film on St Ignatius of Loyola (check link below) as excellent introduction for the Ignatian Jubilee Year (May 20, 2021 to July 31, 2022)

Watch Bishop Barron's Newest Feature-Length Film CATHOLICISM The Pivotal Players: St. Ignatius of Loyola - The Founder

03/04/2021
03/04/2021

"Rejoice, let mother church also rejoice, arrayed with the lightning of His glory; let this holy building shake with joy, filled with the mighty voices of the peoples" (excerpt from the Exultet).

*evening shot of the rear of Saint Ignatius of Loyola Chapel, with the triptych altar glass wall showing the iron crucifix and tabernacle.

"Rejoice, let mother church also rejoice, arrayed with the lightning of His glory; let this holy building shake with joy, filled with the mighty voices of the peoples" (excerpt from the Exultet).

*evening shot of the rear of Saint Ignatius of Loyola Chapel, with the triptych altar glass wall showing the iron crucifix and tabernacle.

Mirador Heritage and Eco Park: A New Place of Reflection and Relaxation in Baguio City – BCG 01/04/2021

Mirador Heritage and Eco Park: A New Place of Reflection and Relaxation in Baguio City – BCG

Mirador Heritage and Eco Park: A New Place of Reflection and Relaxation in Baguio City – BCG By baguiocityguide ShareShare TravelMirador Heritage and Eco Park: A New Place of Reflection and Relaxation in Baguio City January 21, 202181 views0 Jump to Article Content What’s Inside Mirador Heritage and Eco Park Rock GardensArashiyama Bamboo Grove Peace MemorialSunset ViewFoggy ViewMirador He...

30/03/2021

“In order for the light to shine so brightly, the darkness must be present” (Sir Francis Bacon).

*Saint Peter Favre House at nightfall

“In order for the light to shine so brightly, the darkness must be present” (Sir Francis Bacon).

*Saint Peter Favre House at nightfall

29/03/2021

This.

#IgnitedToInspire

28/03/2021

Palm Sunday of the Lord's Passion | 28 Mar 21

28/03/2021

Palm Sunday of the Lord's Passion | 28 Mar 21

27/03/2021

"If there is light in the soul, there will be beauty in the person. If there is beauty in the person, there will be harmony in the house. If there is harmony in the house, there will be order in the nation. If there is order in the nation, there will be peace in the world" (Chinese Proverb).

*evening mood shot of a section of the St. Peter Favre House

"If there is light in the soul, there will be beauty in the person. If there is beauty in the person, there will be harmony in the house. If there is harmony in the house, there will be order in the nation. If there is order in the nation, there will be peace in the world" (Chinese Proverb).

*evening mood shot of a section of the St. Peter Favre House

27/03/2021

DARKNESS AT NOON: Scott Hahn Reflects on Passion Sunday

Readings:
Isaiah 50:4–7
Psalm 22:8–9, 17–20, 23–24
Philippians 2:6–11
Mark 14:1–15:47

Crowned with thorns, our Lord is lifted up on the Cross, where He dies as “King of the Jews.” Notice how many times He is called “king” in today’s Gospel—mostly in scorn and mockery.

As we hear the long accounts of His Passion, at every turn we must remind ourselves—He suffered this cruel and unusual violence for us.

He is the Suffering Servant foretold by Isaiah in today’s First Reading. He reenacts the agony described in today’s Psalm, and even dies with the first words of that Psalm on His lips (see Psalm 22:1).

Listen carefully for the echoes of this Psalm throughout today’s Gospel—as Jesus is beaten, His hands and feet are pierced; as His enemies gamble for His clothes, wagging their heads, mocking His faith in God’s love, His faith that God will deliver Him.

Are we that much different from our Lord’s tormenters? Often, don’t we deny that He is King, refusing to obey His only commands that we love Him and one another? Don’t we render Him mock tribute, pay Him lip service with our half-hearted devotions?

In the dark noon of Calvary, the veil in Jerusalem’s temple was torn. It was a sign that by His death Jesus destroyed forever the barrier separating us from the presence of God.

He was God and yet humbled Himself to come among us, we’re reminded in today’s Epistle. And despite our repeated failures, our frailty, Jesus still humbles Himself to come to us, offering us His body and blood in the Eucharist.

His enemies never understood: His kingship isn’t of this world (see John 18:36). He wants to write His law, His rule of life on our hearts and minds.

As we enter Holy Week, let us once more resolve to give Him dominion in our lives. Let us take up the cross He gives to us—and confess with all our hearts, minds, and strength that truly this is the Son of God.

DARKNESS AT NOON: Scott Hahn Reflects on Passion Sunday

Readings:
Isaiah 50:4–7
Psalm 22:8–9, 17–20, 23–24
Philippians 2:6–11
Mark 14:1–15:47

Crowned with thorns, our Lord is lifted up on the Cross, where He dies as “King of the Jews.” Notice how many times He is called “king” in today’s Gospel—mostly in scorn and mockery.

As we hear the long accounts of His Passion, at every turn we must remind ourselves—He suffered this cruel and unusual violence for us.

He is the Suffering Servant foretold by Isaiah in today’s First Reading. He reenacts the agony described in today’s Psalm, and even dies with the first words of that Psalm on His lips (see Psalm 22:1).

Listen carefully for the echoes of this Psalm throughout today’s Gospel—as Jesus is beaten, His hands and feet are pierced; as His enemies gamble for His clothes, wagging their heads, mocking His faith in God’s love, His faith that God will deliver Him.

Are we that much different from our Lord’s tormenters? Often, don’t we deny that He is King, refusing to obey His only commands that we love Him and one another? Don’t we render Him mock tribute, pay Him lip service with our half-hearted devotions?

In the dark noon of Calvary, the veil in Jerusalem’s temple was torn. It was a sign that by His death Jesus destroyed forever the barrier separating us from the presence of God.

He was God and yet humbled Himself to come among us, we’re reminded in today’s Epistle. And despite our repeated failures, our frailty, Jesus still humbles Himself to come to us, offering us His body and blood in the Eucharist.

His enemies never understood: His kingship isn’t of this world (see John 18:36). He wants to write His law, His rule of life on our hearts and minds.

As we enter Holy Week, let us once more resolve to give Him dominion in our lives. Let us take up the cross He gives to us—and confess with all our hearts, minds, and strength that truly this is the Son of God.

Pope Francis appoints Cardinal Advincula as new Manila archbishop 25/03/2021

Pope Francis appoints Cardinal Advincula as new Manila archbishop

Pope Francis appoints Cardinal Advincula as new Manila archbishop Pope Francis on Thursday has appointed Cardinal Jose Advincula of Capiz as the new archbishop of Manila.

25/03/2021

"Mary was and is present in these days of the pandemic, near to the people who, unfortunately, have concluded their earthly journey all alone, without the comfort of or the closeness of their loved ones. Mary is always there next to us, with her maternal tenderness" (Pope Francis, in a March 24 Tweet @pontifex)

#annunciation #mothermary #blessedmother #theotokos

"Mary was and is present in these days of the pandemic, near to the people who, unfortunately, have concluded their earthly journey all alone, without the comfort of or the closeness of their loved ones. Mary is always there next to us, with her maternal tenderness" (Pope Francis, in a March 24 Tweet @pontifex)

#annunciation #mothermary #blessedmother #theotokos

23/03/2021

"The seat of the soul is where the inner world and the outer world meet" (Joseph Campbell).

*mood shot of the former admin office repurposed to be a conference room, with old chairs against faux brick flooring

"The seat of the soul is where the inner world and the outer world meet" (Joseph Campbell).

*mood shot of the former admin office repurposed to be a conference room, with old chairs against faux brick flooring

22/03/2021

The power of our mind and imagination is such that they can create so much more than what really is. This is how we are able to come up with new technology, innovative solutions and different options. Used in a negative way, though, our thoughts can make things seem worse than they truly are. We can form our own ghosts. We can draw horrifying possibilities, not paying heed to better paths that we can tread. We can wallow in unhelpful and unhealthy doubt, regret, or guilt.

It is normal to be concerned, especially given what we have been going through. But if we allow our anxious thoughts to rob us of the clarity which we need in order to carry on the fight well, then we diminish our own strength. If we let them blind us from seeing graces and blessings, then we make despair our own choice. If we give in to the shadows our worries can cast, we may eventually succumb to darkness. In fact, Saint Francis Sales offers us these words:

“Anxiety is the greatest evil that can befall a soul except sin.
God commands you to pray, but He forbids you to worry.”

As much as we have reasons to feel anxiety, may we persist in prayer that grounds us in His comforting presence. As much as we have known fear, may we allow hope from time with Him to take deeper root in our hearts. As much as we face confusion, may trust and faith in the Lord that can be deepened while praying dictate our actions more. And so, let us always allow ourselves access to our most essential lifelines these days: God’s words, His ways and His will. Communing with our Divine Protector and listening to Him in prayer is one of the greatest gifts we can give ourselves during this time.

#aihpraynotworry
#ateneoishome

21/03/2021

THE TWO STANDARDS AND LETTING GO

It was the last day of a recovery retreat when my partner, Sister Mary Michael, pulled me aside with a concern over one of our retreatants. One mom would admit that she was powerless over her son’s addiction, but seconds later would search for ways to stop his drug use. She did not seem to realize that she was saying one thing while doing another.

Because I’d been in her shoes, I knew how hard it is to accept our need to “let go and let God.” I wondered, “Is there an effective way to help her see what she is doing?”

That is when the Meditation on the Two Standards came to mind. I’d used this meditation to familiarize myself with the characteristics of both Christ and the enemy. It was my go-to resource when I became worried about our situation. If seeds of doubt and shame came into my mind, I would know that these were not the fruits of Christ. I would consider the source and let the worry go. If I felt a nagging feeling that I was trying to control things again, I knew that this was God nudging me out of love, offering protection. I would pay attention to those feelings.

In the meditation, St. Ignatius uses the battlefield to illustrate the choices that we are each given. Do we wish to fight under the standard (flag) of Christ or under the standard of the enemy? Because we are loved, we are given the choice. While it seems obvious that we would all want to choose Christ, we need to consider what that means for us.
Ignatius realizes that as humans we can easily slip into self-deception when things get hard, and so he points out the differences between Christ and the enemy to prepare us.

Satan is deceitful and disguises his motives. Meanwhile, Jesus tells us up front that following him will not be easy (Matthew 16:24–25). Ignatius tries to prepare us for this truth. In the Exercises, Ignatius makes sure that we are firmly planted on a solid foundation of God’s love. Then he helps us rid ourselves of our disordered attachments. But before we begin to follow Christ, Ignatius asks us to pause and consider what that means.

When the mom from my weekend retreat showed up at a Lenten retreat, I was grateful for the opportunity to share the Two Standards meditation. I pointed to my head and said, “I know here that I have to let go of my loved ones.” I paused and moved my finger to my heart and said, “But from here it becomes a little more difficult.” Everyone nodded.

I continued, “What happens between our understanding that we are powerless and our accepting that we are powerless? Thoughts such as, “What kind of mom lets go of her child in the greatest time of need?” often come along. Do you think those thoughts come from Christ or from the enemy?”

The room was quiet for a long time. I could see eyes opening. I felt so grateful to offer the practical tool of the Meditation on the Two Standards to help family members have a way to learn to stay close to Christ in their fight for their loved ones.

-Jean Heaton

THE TWO STANDARDS AND LETTING GO

It was the last day of a recovery retreat when my partner, Sister Mary Michael, pulled me aside with a concern over one of our retreatants. One mom would admit that she was powerless over her son’s addiction, but seconds later would search for ways to stop his drug use. She did not seem to realize that she was saying one thing while doing another.

Because I’d been in her shoes, I knew how hard it is to accept our need to “let go and let God.” I wondered, “Is there an effective way to help her see what she is doing?”

That is when the Meditation on the Two Standards came to mind. I’d used this meditation to familiarize myself with the characteristics of both Christ and the enemy. It was my go-to resource when I became worried about our situation. If seeds of doubt and shame came into my mind, I would know that these were not the fruits of Christ. I would consider the source and let the worry go. If I felt a nagging feeling that I was trying to control things again, I knew that this was God nudging me out of love, offering protection. I would pay attention to those feelings.

In the meditation, St. Ignatius uses the battlefield to illustrate the choices that we are each given. Do we wish to fight under the standard (flag) of Christ or under the standard of the enemy? Because we are loved, we are given the choice. While it seems obvious that we would all want to choose Christ, we need to consider what that means for us.
Ignatius realizes that as humans we can easily slip into self-deception when things get hard, and so he points out the differences between Christ and the enemy to prepare us.

Satan is deceitful and disguises his motives. Meanwhile, Jesus tells us up front that following him will not be easy (Matthew 16:24–25). Ignatius tries to prepare us for this truth. In the Exercises, Ignatius makes sure that we are firmly planted on a solid foundation of God’s love. Then he helps us rid ourselves of our disordered attachments. But before we begin to follow Christ, Ignatius asks us to pause and consider what that means.

When the mom from my weekend retreat showed up at a Lenten retreat, I was grateful for the opportunity to share the Two Standards meditation. I pointed to my head and said, “I know here that I have to let go of my loved ones.” I paused and moved my finger to my heart and said, “But from here it becomes a little more difficult.” Everyone nodded.

I continued, “What happens between our understanding that we are powerless and our accepting that we are powerless? Thoughts such as, “What kind of mom lets go of her child in the greatest time of need?” often come along. Do you think those thoughts come from Christ or from the enemy?”

The room was quiet for a long time. I could see eyes opening. I felt so grateful to offer the practical tool of the Meditation on the Two Standards to help family members have a way to learn to stay close to Christ in their fight for their loved ones.

-Jean Heaton

21/03/2021

THE HOUR COMES: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Fifth Sunday of Lent

Readings:
Jeremiah 31:31–34
Psalm 51:3–4, 12–13, 14–15
Hebrews 5:7–9
John 12:20–33

Our readings today are filled with anticipation. The days are coming, Jeremiah prophesies in today’s First Reading. The hour has come, Jesus says in the Gospel. The new covenant that God promised to Jeremiah is made in the “hour” of Jesus—in His Death, Resurrection, and Ascension to the Father’s right hand.

The prophets said this new covenant would return Israel’s exiled tribes from the ends of the world (see Jeremiah 31:1, 3–4, 7–8). Jesus too predicted His passion would gather the dispersed children of God (see John 11:52). But today He promises to draw to Himself not only Israelites, but all men and women.

The new covenant is more than a political or national restoration. As we sing in today’s Psalm, it is a universal spiritual restoration. In the “hour” of Jesus, sinners in every nation can return to the Father—to be washed of their guilt and given new hearts to love and serve Him.

In predicting He will be “lifted up,” Jesus isn’t describing only His coming Crucifixion (see John 3:14–15). Isaiah used the same word to tell how the Messiah, after suffering for Israel’s sins, would be raised high and greatly exalted (see Isaiah 52:3). Elsewhere the term describes how kings are elevated above their subjects (see 1 Maccabees 8:13).

Troubled in His agony, Jesus doesn’t pray to be saved. Instead, as we hear in today’s Epistle, He offers himself to the Father on the Cross—as a living prayer and supplication. For this, God gives Him dominion over heaven and earth (see Acts 2:33; Philippians 2:9).

Where He has gone we can follow—if we let Him lead us. To follow Jesus means hating our lives of sin and selfishness. It means trusting in the Father’s will, the law He has written in our hearts. Jesus’ “hour” continues in the Eucharist, where we join our sacrifices to His, giving God our lives in reverence and obedience—confident He will raise us up to bear fruits of holiness.

THE HOUR COMES: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Fifth Sunday of Lent

Readings:
Jeremiah 31:31–34
Psalm 51:3–4, 12–13, 14–15
Hebrews 5:7–9
John 12:20–33

Our readings today are filled with anticipation. The days are coming, Jeremiah prophesies in today’s First Reading. The hour has come, Jesus says in the Gospel. The new covenant that God promised to Jeremiah is made in the “hour” of Jesus—in His Death, Resurrection, and Ascension to the Father’s right hand.

The prophets said this new covenant would return Israel’s exiled tribes from the ends of the world (see Jeremiah 31:1, 3–4, 7–8). Jesus too predicted His passion would gather the dispersed children of God (see John 11:52). But today He promises to draw to Himself not only Israelites, but all men and women.

The new covenant is more than a political or national restoration. As we sing in today’s Psalm, it is a universal spiritual restoration. In the “hour” of Jesus, sinners in every nation can return to the Father—to be washed of their guilt and given new hearts to love and serve Him.

In predicting He will be “lifted up,” Jesus isn’t describing only His coming Crucifixion (see John 3:14–15). Isaiah used the same word to tell how the Messiah, after suffering for Israel’s sins, would be raised high and greatly exalted (see Isaiah 52:3). Elsewhere the term describes how kings are elevated above their subjects (see 1 Maccabees 8:13).

Troubled in His agony, Jesus doesn’t pray to be saved. Instead, as we hear in today’s Epistle, He offers himself to the Father on the Cross—as a living prayer and supplication. For this, God gives Him dominion over heaven and earth (see Acts 2:33; Philippians 2:9).

Where He has gone we can follow—if we let Him lead us. To follow Jesus means hating our lives of sin and selfishness. It means trusting in the Father’s will, the law He has written in our hearts. Jesus’ “hour” continues in the Eucharist, where we join our sacrifices to His, giving God our lives in reverence and obedience—confident He will raise us up to bear fruits of holiness.

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Good Shepherd Road, Banawa Hills
Cebu City
6000

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 17:00
Friday 09:00 - 17:00
Saturday 09:00 - 17:00
Sunday 09:00 - 17:00
Other Convents & Monasteries in Cebu City (show all)
Eastern Europe Pilgrimage Eastern Europe Pilgrimage
UNIT 103 LUCKY PLAZA BUILDING, OUANO AVE
Cebu City, 6014

A pilgrimage is a journey or search of moral or spiritual significance. Typically, it is a journey to a shrine or other location of importance to a person.

Pope John XXIII Seminary, Mabolo, Cebu Alumni Page Pope John XXIII Seminary, Mabolo, Cebu Alumni Page
Mabolo
Cebu City, 6000

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