Campus Ministry - USC TC

Campus Ministry - USC TC is the official FB page of University of San Carlos Talamban Campus Ministry. USC Campus Ministry - TC is the department in charge of all religious activities in the campus.

Operating as usual

23/06/2021

Noon Mass

Bunzel Noon Mass

22/06/2021

CEBUANO HOLY MASS

06.23.21 CEBUANO HOLY MASS
Live! @ DYRF Broadcast Studio
Presider : Rev. Fr. Ulrich Schlecht, SVD

22/06/2021

Noon Mass

Bunzel Noon Mass

22/06/2021

Today, June 22, is the memorial of St. John Fisher, Bishop and St. Thomas More, Martyr.

John Fisher was born in England in 1469. After he was ordained a priest, the royal family appointed him tutor for Prince Henry, who became King Henry VIII. In 1504, Fisher became bishop of Rochester and also chancellor of Cambridge University. Fisher paid special attention to people who were poor. He wrote eight books against heresy, and Henry, then king, was proud to be his friend.

All this changed when King Henry claimed that his marriage to Catherine, his brother’s widow, was not valid. Henry had become tired of Catherine and interested in young, attractive Anne Boleyn. Henry’s request for a divorce was refused by the pope, and Bishop Fisher supported this decision. He was strong enough to resist signing the document siding with King Henry, though all the other bishops of England had signed it.

Six months later, Henry had parliament write another document, the Oath of Supremacy, claiming that Henry was supreme head of the Catholic Church in England. Again Bishop Fisher refused to sign. This made the king angry. The bishop was sentenced to prison in 1534 on the charge of high treason. The pope declared the jailed bishop a cardinal. Fisher was kept in prison for 14 months without a trial. In June, 1535, he was condemned to death by beheading.

Thomas More was born in 1477, the son of a lawyer in London. He planned to become a priest but then entered law school. His three daughters, son, and friends helped make his home a happy place.

Besides being a shrewd lawyer, Thomas was a charming, witty man, who won the friendship of the king. Henry VIII began his rule of England as a devout king. Later, King Henry asked Thomas to approve of the divorce he wanted. Thomas refused. Of course, the king became angry. By this time, Thomas had become chancellor of England. Henry wanted Thomas on his side. Then when every bishop except John Fisher signed the Oath of Supremacy, Thomas refused to sign. He resigned as chancellor and retired to his country home, hoping for a quiet life with his family.

Thomas, however, was sent to prison. He was kept for more than a year in the Tower of London. The king tried hard to make him change his mind, but Thomas stood firm. He knew this stand would mean certain death for him and disgrace for his family, but he followed his conscience. Finally, after suffering hunger, cold, and loneliness, Thomas was led out to be beheaded on July 6. Seeing that the masked swordsman was quite nervous, Thomas said, “Be not afraid, for you send me to God.” Then he said to the crowd, “I die the king’s good servant, but God’s first.”

text: loyolapress.com
image: pinterest.com

Today, June 22, is the memorial of St. John Fisher, Bishop and St. Thomas More, Martyr.

John Fisher was born in England in 1469. After he was ordained a priest, the royal family appointed him tutor for Prince Henry, who became King Henry VIII. In 1504, Fisher became bishop of Rochester and also chancellor of Cambridge University. Fisher paid special attention to people who were poor. He wrote eight books against heresy, and Henry, then king, was proud to be his friend.

All this changed when King Henry claimed that his marriage to Catherine, his brother’s widow, was not valid. Henry had become tired of Catherine and interested in young, attractive Anne Boleyn. Henry’s request for a divorce was refused by the pope, and Bishop Fisher supported this decision. He was strong enough to resist signing the document siding with King Henry, though all the other bishops of England had signed it.

Six months later, Henry had parliament write another document, the Oath of Supremacy, claiming that Henry was supreme head of the Catholic Church in England. Again Bishop Fisher refused to sign. This made the king angry. The bishop was sentenced to prison in 1534 on the charge of high treason. The pope declared the jailed bishop a cardinal. Fisher was kept in prison for 14 months without a trial. In June, 1535, he was condemned to death by beheading.

Thomas More was born in 1477, the son of a lawyer in London. He planned to become a priest but then entered law school. His three daughters, son, and friends helped make his home a happy place.

Besides being a shrewd lawyer, Thomas was a charming, witty man, who won the friendship of the king. Henry VIII began his rule of England as a devout king. Later, King Henry asked Thomas to approve of the divorce he wanted. Thomas refused. Of course, the king became angry. By this time, Thomas had become chancellor of England. Henry wanted Thomas on his side. Then when every bishop except John Fisher signed the Oath of Supremacy, Thomas refused to sign. He resigned as chancellor and retired to his country home, hoping for a quiet life with his family.

Thomas, however, was sent to prison. He was kept for more than a year in the Tower of London. The king tried hard to make him change his mind, but Thomas stood firm. He knew this stand would mean certain death for him and disgrace for his family, but he followed his conscience. Finally, after suffering hunger, cold, and loneliness, Thomas was led out to be beheaded on July 6. Seeing that the masked swordsman was quite nervous, Thomas said, “Be not afraid, for you send me to God.” Then he said to the crowd, “I die the king’s good servant, but God’s first.”

text: loyolapress.com
image: pinterest.com

22/06/2021

Today, June 22, is the memorial of St. Paulinus of Nola, Bishop.

Anyone who is praised in the letters of six or seven saints undoubtedly must be of extraordinary character. Such a person was Paulinus of Nola, correspondent and friend of Saints Augustine, Jerome, Melania, Martin, Gregory the Great, and Ambrose.

Born near Bordeaux, he was the son of the Roman prefect of Gaul, who had extensive property in both Gaul and Italy. Paulinus became a distinguished lawyer, holding several public offices in the Roman Empire. With his Spanish wife, Therasia, he retired at an early age to a life of cultured leisure.

The two were baptized by the saintly bishop of Bordeaux and moved to Therasia’s estate in Spain. After many childless years, they had a son who died a week after birth. This occasioned their beginning a life of great austerity and charity, giving away most of their Spanish property. Possibly as a result of this great example, Paulinus was rather unexpectedly ordained a priest at Christmas by the bishop of Barcelona.

He and his wife then moved to Nola, near Naples. He had a great love for Saint Felix of Nola, and spent much effort in promoting devotion to this saint. Paulinus gave away most of his remaining property—to the consternation of his relatives—and continued his work for the poor. Supporting a host of debtors, the homeless and other needy people, he lived a monastic life in another part of his home. By popular demand he was made bishop of Nola and guided that diocese for 21 years.

Paulinus’ last years were saddened by the invasion of the Huns. Among his few writings is the earliest extant Christian wedding song. His liturgical feast is celebrated on June 22.

text: franciscanmedia.org
image: anastpaul.com

Today, June 22, is the memorial of St. Paulinus of Nola, Bishop.

Anyone who is praised in the letters of six or seven saints undoubtedly must be of extraordinary character. Such a person was Paulinus of Nola, correspondent and friend of Saints Augustine, Jerome, Melania, Martin, Gregory the Great, and Ambrose.

Born near Bordeaux, he was the son of the Roman prefect of Gaul, who had extensive property in both Gaul and Italy. Paulinus became a distinguished lawyer, holding several public offices in the Roman Empire. With his Spanish wife, Therasia, he retired at an early age to a life of cultured leisure.

The two were baptized by the saintly bishop of Bordeaux and moved to Therasia’s estate in Spain. After many childless years, they had a son who died a week after birth. This occasioned their beginning a life of great austerity and charity, giving away most of their Spanish property. Possibly as a result of this great example, Paulinus was rather unexpectedly ordained a priest at Christmas by the bishop of Barcelona.

He and his wife then moved to Nola, near Naples. He had a great love for Saint Felix of Nola, and spent much effort in promoting devotion to this saint. Paulinus gave away most of his remaining property—to the consternation of his relatives—and continued his work for the poor. Supporting a host of debtors, the homeless and other needy people, he lived a monastic life in another part of his home. By popular demand he was made bishop of Nola and guided that diocese for 21 years.

Paulinus’ last years were saddened by the invasion of the Huns. Among his few writings is the earliest extant Christian wedding song. His liturgical feast is celebrated on June 22.

text: franciscanmedia.org
image: anastpaul.com

21/06/2021

CEBUANO HOLY MASS

06.22.21 CEBUANO HOLY MASS
[email protected] DYRF Broadcast Studio
Rev. Fr. Manuel Mijares, SVD

21/06/2021

Noon Mass

Bunzel Noon Mass

21/06/2021

Today, June 21, is the memorial of St. Aloysius Gonzaga, Religious.

The Lord can make saints anywhere, even amid the brutality and license of Renaissance life. Florence was the “mother of piety” for Aloysius Gonzaga despite his exposure to a “society of fraud, dagger, poison, and lust.” As a son of a princely family, he grew up in royal courts and army camps. His father wanted Aloysius to be a military hero.

At age 7 Aloysius experienced a profound spiritual quickening. His prayers included the Office of Mary, the psalms, and other devotions. At age 9 he came from his hometown of Castiglione to Florence to be educated; by age 11 he was teaching catechism to poor children, fasting three days a week, and practicing great austerities. When he was 13 years old, he traveled with his parents and the Empress of Austria to Spain, and acted as a page in the court of Philip II. The more Aloysius saw of court life, the more disillusioned he became, seeking relief in learning about the lives of saints.

A book about the experience of Jesuit missionaries in India suggested to him the idea of entering the Society of Jesus, and in Spain his decision became final. Now began a four-year contest with his father. Eminent churchmen and laypeople were pressed into service to persuade Aloysius to remain in his “normal” vocation. Finally he prevailed, was allowed to renounce his right to succession, and was received into the Jesuit novitiate.

Like other seminarians, Aloysius was faced with a new kind of penance—that of accepting different ideas about the exact nature of penance. He was obliged to eat more, and to take recreation with the other students. He was forbidden to pray except at stated times. He spent four years in the study of philosophy and had Saint Robert Bellarmine as his spiritual adviser.

In 1591, a plague struck Rome. The Jesuits opened a hospital of their own. The superior general himself and many other Jesuits rendered personal service. Because he nursed patients, washing them and making their beds, Aloysius caught the disease. A fever persisted after his recovery and he was so weak he could scarcely rise from bed. Yet he maintained his great discipline of prayer, knowing that he would die three months later within the octave of Corpus Christi, at the age of 23.

text: franciscanmedia.org
image: hardonsj.org

Today, June 21, is the memorial of St. Aloysius Gonzaga, Religious.

The Lord can make saints anywhere, even amid the brutality and license of Renaissance life. Florence was the “mother of piety” for Aloysius Gonzaga despite his exposure to a “society of fraud, dagger, poison, and lust.” As a son of a princely family, he grew up in royal courts and army camps. His father wanted Aloysius to be a military hero.

At age 7 Aloysius experienced a profound spiritual quickening. His prayers included the Office of Mary, the psalms, and other devotions. At age 9 he came from his hometown of Castiglione to Florence to be educated; by age 11 he was teaching catechism to poor children, fasting three days a week, and practicing great austerities. When he was 13 years old, he traveled with his parents and the Empress of Austria to Spain, and acted as a page in the court of Philip II. The more Aloysius saw of court life, the more disillusioned he became, seeking relief in learning about the lives of saints.

A book about the experience of Jesuit missionaries in India suggested to him the idea of entering the Society of Jesus, and in Spain his decision became final. Now began a four-year contest with his father. Eminent churchmen and laypeople were pressed into service to persuade Aloysius to remain in his “normal” vocation. Finally he prevailed, was allowed to renounce his right to succession, and was received into the Jesuit novitiate.

Like other seminarians, Aloysius was faced with a new kind of penance—that of accepting different ideas about the exact nature of penance. He was obliged to eat more, and to take recreation with the other students. He was forbidden to pray except at stated times. He spent four years in the study of philosophy and had Saint Robert Bellarmine as his spiritual adviser.

In 1591, a plague struck Rome. The Jesuits opened a hospital of their own. The superior general himself and many other Jesuits rendered personal service. Because he nursed patients, washing them and making their beds, Aloysius caught the disease. A fever persisted after his recovery and he was so weak he could scarcely rise from bed. Yet he maintained his great discipline of prayer, knowing that he would die three months later within the octave of Corpus Christi, at the age of 23.

text: franciscanmedia.org
image: hardonsj.org

20/06/2021

CEBUANO HOLY MASS

06.221.21 CEBUANO HOLY MASS
LIVE! @ DYRF Broadcast Studio
Rev. Fr. Eleno Bucia, SVD

20/06/2021

12th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Sunday Mass

19/06/2021

Today, June 19, is the memorial of St. Romuald, Abbot.

In the midst of a wasted youth, Romuald watched his father kill a relative in a duel over property. In horror he fled to a monastery near Ravenna. After three years, some of the monks found him to be uncomfortably holy and eased him out.

Romuald spent the next 30 years going about Italy, founding monasteries and hermitages. He longed to give his life to Christ in martyrdom, and got the pope’s permission to preach the gospel in Hungary. But he was struck with illness as soon as he arrived, and the illness recurred as often as he tried to proceed.

During another period of his life, Romuald suffered great spiritual dryness. One day as he was praying Psalm 31 (“I will give you understanding and I will instruct you”), he was given an extraordinary light and spirit which never left him.

At the next monastery where he stayed, Romuald was accused of a scandalous crime by a young nobleman he had rebuked for a dissolute life. Amazingly, his fellow monks believed the accusation. He was given a severe penance, forbidden from offering Mass, and excommunicated—an unjust sentence that he endured in silence for six months.

The most famous of the monasteries Romuald founded was that of the Camaldoli in Tuscany. Here began the Order of the Camaldolese Benedictines, uniting the monastic and eremitical lives. In later life Romuald’s own father became a monk, wavered, and was kept faithful by the encouragement of his son.

text: franciscanmedia.org
image: catholicculture.org

Today, June 19, is the memorial of St. Romuald, Abbot.

In the midst of a wasted youth, Romuald watched his father kill a relative in a duel over property. In horror he fled to a monastery near Ravenna. After three years, some of the monks found him to be uncomfortably holy and eased him out.

Romuald spent the next 30 years going about Italy, founding monasteries and hermitages. He longed to give his life to Christ in martyrdom, and got the pope’s permission to preach the gospel in Hungary. But he was struck with illness as soon as he arrived, and the illness recurred as often as he tried to proceed.

During another period of his life, Romuald suffered great spiritual dryness. One day as he was praying Psalm 31 (“I will give you understanding and I will instruct you”), he was given an extraordinary light and spirit which never left him.

At the next monastery where he stayed, Romuald was accused of a scandalous crime by a young nobleman he had rebuked for a dissolute life. Amazingly, his fellow monks believed the accusation. He was given a severe penance, forbidden from offering Mass, and excommunicated—an unjust sentence that he endured in silence for six months.

The most famous of the monasteries Romuald founded was that of the Camaldoli in Tuscany. Here began the Order of the Camaldolese Benedictines, uniting the monastic and eremitical lives. In later life Romuald’s own father became a monk, wavered, and was kept faithful by the encouragement of his son.

text: franciscanmedia.org
image: catholicculture.org

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Noon Mass
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CEBUANO HOLY MASS
12th Sunday in Ordinary Time
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Nasipit, Talamban Cebu City
Cebu City
600
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